Wild Things

The weird and wonderful in the natural world

Sarah Zielinski

Wild Things


Wild Things

Seabirds may navigate by scent

Cory's shearwater

Cory’s shearwaters manage to find their way across long distances over open water using olfactory clues, a new study concludes.

Sponsor Message

Seabirds called shearwaters manage to navigate across long stretches of open water to islands where the birds breed. It’s not been clear how the birds do this, but there have been some clues. When scientists magnetically disturbed Cory’s shearwaters, the birds still managed to find their way. But when deprived of their sense of smell, the shearwaters had trouble homing in on their final destination.

Smell wouldn’t seem to be all that useful out over the ocean, especially with winds and other atmospheric disturbances playing havoc on any scents wafting through the air. But now researchers say they have more evidence that shearwaters are using olfactory cues to navigate. Andrew Reynolds of Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, England, and colleagues make their case June 30 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Messing with Cory’s shearwaters or other seabirds, like researchers did in earlier studies, wasn’t a good option, the researchers say, because there are conservation concerns when it comes to these species. Instead, they attached tiny GPS loggers to 210 shearwaters belonging to three species: Cory’s shearwaters, Scopoli’s shearwaters and Cape Verde shearwaters.

But how would the birds’ path reveal how they were navigating? If they were using olfactory cues, the team reasoned, the birds wouldn’t take a straight path to their target. Instead, they would fly straight for a time, guided in that direction by a particular smell. When they lost that scent, their direction would change, until they picked up another scent that could guide them. And only when a bird got close would it use landmarks, other birds and the odor of the breeding colony as guides. If the birds were using some other method of navigation — or randomly searching for where to go — their paths would look much different.

When the researchers analyzed the paths of the shearwaters, 69 percent of the birds moved in a way that matched what was expected if they were using olfactory cues. Nearly all of the journeys that lasted four or more days took this kind of path, but less than half of short flights that lasted less than two days had this kind of flight path.

“All these animals share the same basic pattern,” the researchers write, “strongly suggesting the presence of an underlying common mechanism of orientation which we have identified as olfactory-cued navigation.”

Paleontology,, Evolution

Your toy stegosaurus may be a girl

By Sarah Zielinski 2:00pm, April 22, 2015
Male and female stegosaurs may have looked different, a new study finds.
Animals,, Oceans

Growth of mining on land may promote invasions at sea

By Sarah Zielinski 7:46pm, April 21, 2015
Ballast water taken in to keep ships stable could, when discharged elsewhere, release species that become invasive in their new homes.
Ecosystems,, Ecology

Before you plant this spring, consider the birds

By Sarah Zielinski 10:00am, April 20, 2015
A study of Chicago neighborhoods finds that the plants in private yards influence the variety of birds that live in the area.
Animals

How many manatees live in Florida?

By Sarah Zielinski 4:30pm, April 15, 2015
The most recent official count reports more than 6,000 manatees in Florida waters, but a new estimate may give a better picture of the population.

Flight delayed: There’s a coyote on the runway

By Sarah Zielinski 9:00am, April 14, 2015
A new study tallies up airport incidents involving carnivores and finds coyotes are the biggest threat.
Animals,, Oceans

Tiny sea turtles are swimmers, not drifters

By Sarah Zielinski 12:00pm, April 9, 2015
Young green and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles moved in different directions than instruments set adrift in the sea, which shows the animals were swimming.
Animals,, Ecology,, Climate

Eggs and other land foods won’t feed polar bears

By Sarah Zielinski 9:00am, April 5, 2015
Polar bears will not be able to survive on land by eating birds, eggs and vegetation, a new review concludes.
Animals,, Conservation

How human activities may be creating coywolves

By Sarah Zielinski 8:00am, April 1, 2015
Endangered red wolves will mate with coyotes when their partners are killed, which often happens because of human activities, a new study finds.
Animals,, Conservation

‘If you build it they will come’ fails for turtle crossings

By Sarah Zielinski 2:00pm, March 25, 2015
Turtles and snakes barely used an ecopassage built to make their movements safer. Scientists blame poor fencing that failed to keep them off the roadway.
Animals,, Conservation

Conservationists should make friends with hunters

By Sarah Zielinski 1:22pm, March 20, 2015
A survey of outdoor enthusiasts in rural New York finds that both hunters and birdwatchers are likely to engage in conservation behaviors, such as donating money.
Subscribe to RSS - Wild Things