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E.g., 03/20/2019
E.g., 03/20/2019
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Your search has returned 111110 articles:
  • Television

    ‘Epic Yellowstone’ captures the thriving ecosystem of the world-famous park

    “What you’re about to experience is Yellowstone as it’s rarely seen,” actor and Montana resident Bill Pullman says in the opening narration of a new documentary. Smithsonian Channel’s Epic Yellowstone, a four-part series that airs this month and will be available via several streaming services, puts Yellowstone National Park’s recovering ecosystem into the limelight. The park went nearly half...

    03/17/2019 - 07:00 Animals, Conservation, Ecology
  • How Bizarre

    Some shrimp make plasma with their claws. Now a 3-D printed claw can too

    Some shrimp have a secret superpower: Snapping their claws unleashes bubbles that produce plasma and shock waves to stun prey. Now a 3-D printed replica claw has reproduced the phenomenon in the lab, scientists report March 15 in Science Advances.

    When a snapping shrimp (Alpheus formosus and related species) slams its powerful claw shut, it spews a jet of water. That fast-moving stream...

    03/15/2019 - 14:00 Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    U.S. heart attack mortality reached a two-decade low in 2014

    Heart-healthy changes to diet and exercise along with a national focus on improving treatment and recovery from heart attacks appears to be making a difference.

    Fewer older adults are having heart attacks, and fewer of those who do die as a result, according to an analysis of more than 4.3 million U.S. Medicare patients that spanned two decades up to 2014.

    The percentage of...

    03/15/2019 - 11:30 Health
  • Exhibit

    A new T. rex exhibit takes a deep dive into the iconic dinosaur

    Ultrafierce Tyrannosaurus rex is an icon. But the “tyrant lizard king,” which lived between 68 million and 66 million years ago, is just the youngest member of a family of dinosaurs that went back to about 167 million years ago. The earliest tyrannosaurs were quick and small. So how did T. rex become so big and bad?

    That’s one of the questions at the heart of “T. rex: The Ultimate...

    03/15/2019 - 07:00 Paleontology, Animals, Science & Society
  • March 16, 2019

    03/14/2019 - 14:33
  • News

    The rise of farming altered our bite and changed how people talk

    Humankind’s gift of gab is not set in stone, and farming could help to explain why.

    Over the last 6,000 years or so, farming societies increasingly have substituted processed dairy and grain products for tougher-to-chew game meat and wild plants common in hunter-gatherer diets. Switching to those diets of softer, processed foods altered people’s jaw structure over time, rendering certain...

    03/14/2019 - 14:00 Language, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Flickers and buzzes sweep mouse brains of Alzheimer’s plaques

    Fast clicking sounds can boost brainpower in mice with signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Like flickering lights, these external sounds spur a type of brain wave that seemed to sweep disease-related plaques from mice’s brains, researchers report in the March 14 Cell.It’s too early to say whether the same sorts of flickers and clicks could help people with Alzheimer’s. If so, the treatment would...

    03/14/2019 - 11:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Students worldwide are striking to demand action on climate change

    For the past several months, growing numbers of students around the world have been cutting class — not to play but to protest.

    The topic driving them is the same: Earth’s changing climate, as evidenced by increasing wildfires and droughts, rising seas and more extreme weather. As the students see it, governments have not done enough to cut the emissions of greenhouse gases, such as...

    03/14/2019 - 08:00 Climate, Science & Society
  • Feature

    What happens when the Bering Sea’s ice disappears?

    Peggy’s data were a bit of a shock.

    From an anchored vantage point in an expanse of the southeastern Bering Sea west of Alaska, Peggy, or mooring M2, had monitored conditions in the water for 25 years. A line of sensors extended down more than 70 meters to where Peggy was tethered to the seafloor, collecting information on temperature, salinity and other properties of the water.

    ...

    03/14/2019 - 06:45 Climate, Oceans, Ecosystems
  • News in Brief

    An origami design helps this robot lift delicate and heavy cargo

    A new robotic gripper is a strong “hand” with a soft touch.

    The bell-shaped gripper has a silicone rubber skeleton with an intricate origami design, wrapped in an airtight, latex rubber skin. When a vacuum sucks air out of the gripper, the skin constricts, forcing the origami skeleton to collapse into a narrow funnel. The bunched-up gripper’s ridged interior and rough latex skin help it...

    03/14/2019 - 00:05 Robotics, Technology