Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 02/26/2017
E.g., 02/26/2017
Your search has returned 345 images:
  • bubble boy
  • Hercules beetles
  • East Asian hunter-gatherer skull
Your search has returned 433 articles:
  • News

    Force-detecting protein senses when lungs fill with air

    Scientists investigating what keeps lungs from overinflating can quit holding their breath.

    Experiments in mice have identified a protein that senses when the lungs are full of air. This protein helps regulate breathing in adult mice and gets breathing going in newborn mice, researchers report online December 21 in Nature.

    If the protein plays a similar role in people — and a few...

    12/21/2016 - 13:01 Biophysics, Genetics, Neuroscience
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, alcohol use was linked to several gene variants

    A case for genetic drinking

    Whether one drinks at all, how much and how often are partly due to heredity, [according to a Finnish study of 902 male twins].… A genetic element in alcoholism “seems highly plausible,” [researchers] said.… Surprisingly, genes also have much to do with creating an abstainer. Lack of control — which should resemble alcoholism — is no single gene, but a group...

    12/15/2016 - 15:30 Genetics
  • Science Ticker

    Genome clues help explain the strange life of seahorses

    A seahorse’s genetic instruction book is giving biologists a few insights into the creature’s odd physical features and rare parenting style.

    Researchers decoded a male tiger tail seahorse’s (Hippocampus comes) genome and compared it to the genomes of other seahorses and ray-finned fishes. The analysis revealed a bevy of missing genes and other genetic elements responsible for enamel and...

    12/14/2016 - 16:30 Animals, Genetics, Evolution
  • Feature

    Year in review: ‘Three-parent baby’ technique raises hope and concern

    A “three-parent baby” was born in April, the world’s first reported birth from a controversial technique designed to prevent mitochondrial diseases from passing from mother to child.

    “As far as we can tell, the baby is normal and free of disease,” says Andrew R. La Barbera, chief scientific officer of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. “This demonstrates that, in point of...

    12/14/2016 - 07:39 Genetics, Science & Society, Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Year in review: How humans populated the globe

    No paper or digital trails document ancient humans’ journey out of Africa to points around the globe. Fortunately, those intrepid travelers left a DNA trail. Genetic studies released in 2016 put a new molecular spin on humans’ long-ago migrations. These investigations also underscore the long trek ahead for scientists trying to reconstruct Stone Age road trips.

    “I’m beginning to suspect...

    12/14/2016 - 07:37 Genetics, Archaeology
  • Feature

    Year in review: ‘Minimal genome’ makes its debut

    One of biology’s biggest achievements of 2016 was intentionally as small as possible: building a bacterium with only 473 genes. That pint-size genetic blueprint, the smallest for any known free-living cell, is a milestone in a decades-long effort to create an organism containing just the bare essentials necessary to exist and reproduce. Such “minimal genome” cells might eventually serve as...

    12/14/2016 - 07:36 Microbiology, Genetics, Cells
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers contemplate corals and more

    Corals in crisis

    Algae that provide nutrients to corals turn toxic and lead the corals to “bleach” and sometimes die when ocean temperatures spike. Researchers are seeding damaged reefs with baby corals and breeding heat-tolerant corals to help these imperiled marine animals, Amy McDermott reported in “Rebuilding reefs” (SN: 10/29/16, p. 18).

    Ronald Swager wondered if researchers could...

    12/14/2016 - 06:00 Oceans, Genetics, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Having an extra chromosome has a surprising effect on cancer

    SAN FRANCISCO — Having an extra chromosome may suppress cancer, as long as things don’t get stressful, a new study suggests. The finding may help scientists unravel a paradox: Cells with extra chromosomes grow slower than cells with the usual two copies of each chromosome, but cancer cells, which grow quickly, often have additional chromosomes. Researchers have thought that perhaps extra...

    12/07/2016 - 16:31 Cells, Cancer, Genetics
  • News

    Tweaking how plants manage a crisis boosts photosynthesis

    Enhancing just three genes helps plants harvest more light, raising new hopes for developing crops that can keep up with food demands from a crowded planet.

    Genetically engineered tobacco plants, chosen to test the concept, managed the unusual feat of growing 14 to 20 percent more mass — meaning more crop yield — than untweaked plants, says Krishna Niyogi of the University of California...

    11/17/2016 - 14:45 Plants, Agriculture, Genetics
  • Science Ticker

    Chinese patient is first to be treated with CRISPR-edited cells

    Chinese scientists have injected a person with CRISPR/Cas9-edited cells, marking the first time cells altered with the technique have been used in humans. Researchers used the powerful gene editor to alter immune cells to fight lung cancer, Nature reports November 15.

    Immune cells called CAR-T cells have already been engineered using other gene-editing technologies. A baby’s leukemia was...

    11/16/2016 - 07:00 Clinical Trials, Cancer, Genetics