Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Search Content

E.g., 09/21/2018
E.g., 09/21/2018
Your search has returned 42 images:
  • types of bread
  • Arizona wheat field
  • MRI of baboon hearts
Your search has returned 497 articles:
  • Say What?

    The five basic tastes have sixth sibling: oleogustus

    Oleogustus/OH-lee-oh-GUHS-tuhs/ n.

    The taste of certain fats.

    Move over, umami. Fat is the newest member of the pantheon of basic tastes, joining salty, sweet, sour, bitter and savory, or umami.

    Researchers at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., conducted taste tests pitting a variety of fats against flavors in the other taste categories, such as monosodium glutamate for...

    07/31/2015 - 06:00 Nutrition, Physiology
  • Scicurious

    How trans fats oozed into our diet and out again

    On June 16 the Food and Drug Administration made the final call: Trans fats are no longer “generally recognized as safe” for use in food. That means that food manufacturers have three years to ooze these cheap and useful fats out of their processed foods.

    In fact, most of them already have. Trans fat —a big source of which is partially hydrogenated vegetable oils — has been the food...

    07/29/2015 - 14:24 Nutrition, Science & Society
  • Letters to the Editor

    Puzzling cosmic signals, processed food defined and more reader feedback

    To edit or not

    A controversial paper about modifying genes in fertilized human eggs raised some serious ethical concerns. Tina Hesman Saey covered researchers’ arguments for and against this type of genetic engineering in “Editing human germline cells debated” (SN: 5/30/15, p. 16).

    Many readers embraced the idea of making permanent changes to human DNA. “If someone wants to...

    07/01/2015 - 09:14 Cells, Nutrition, Astronomy
  • News

    Curtailing calories on a schedule yields health benefits

    Diet smarter, not longer.

    Slashing your food intake for just five consecutive days a month can yield a bounty of health benefits, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Southern California. This briefer approach to caloric restriction, a severe form of dieting, challenges previous research that dieters might need to tighten their belts as often as twice a week...

    06/18/2015 - 12:12 Nutrition, Cells, Physiology
  • Feature

    Typical American diet can damage immune system

    Blair River was described as “a big guy with a big heart.” The 575-pound former high school wrestler from Mesa, Ariz., became such a fixture at the Heart Attack Grill that he was recruited to be the restaurant’s official spokesperson. His satirical ads made him a minor celebrity in central Arizona.  He died in 2011 at age 29 — not because of his heart but from complications of influenza.

    ...
    05/18/2015 - 13:00 Microbiology, Nutrition
  • News

    Brains may be wired to count calories, make healthy choices

    Fruit flies’ brains may be wired to count calories.

    Several genes in the brain appear to help the flies learn to distinguish between normal-calorie and high-calorie foods — and to remember to choose the healthier option later. Feeding the flies a constant diet of high-calorie foods disrupts their ability to make these metabolic memories, researchers report April 7 in Nature...

    04/07/2015 - 11:00 Neuroscience, Nutrition, Genetics
  • News

    For healthy eating, timing matters

    View the video

    When you eat may determine how long and strong your heart beats.

    Fruit flies that limited eating to 12-hour stints had steadier heartbeats in old age than flies that ate whenever they wanted, researchers report in the March 13 Science. The study adds to a growing body of evidence that the timing of meals may be as important for health as diet composition and calorie...

    03/12/2015 - 14:00 Physiology, Nutrition
  • Scicurious

    Report offers stimulating recommendation on coffee

    A new round of dietary do’s and don’ts accompanied last month’s scientific report on the latest food research, summarizing everything from aspartame to saturated fats. The report puts eggs back on the menu. High dietary cholesterol is no longer linked to blood cholesterol in most healthy people. But what grabbed the headlines? Coffee, of course.

    Many of us are happy to raise a mug to our...

    03/04/2015 - 15:13 Nutrition
  • Feature

    For athletes, antioxidant pills may not help performance

    In the fickle world of sports nutrition fads, few trends have shown the staying power of antioxidants. For more than three decades, athletes have remained devoted fans of supplements; the American College of Sports Medicine estimates that around half of elite athletes take vitamins in hopes of keeping their bodies fit and boosting endurance.

    The idea makes intuitive sense: Energy...

    02/24/2015 - 12:00 Health, Physiology, Nutrition
  • News

    Hydrogen sulfide offers clue to how reducing calories lengthens lives

    Tapping into an ancient cellular energy source may help stave off the rigors of surgery and the ravages of age.

    Hydrogen sulfide, a foul-smelling poisonous gas that microbes have been munching for eons, may be responsible for the health benefits and life-extending effects of reduced-calorie diets, scientists propose December 23 in Cell. Caloric restriction is a proven method for...

    12/23/2014 - 18:28 Cells, Physiology, Nutrition