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  • Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
  • Ibrahim Cissé
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Your search has returned 591 articles:
  • News

    A newly approved drug could be a boon for treating malaria

    The first new treatment in 60 years for a particularly stubborn kind of malaria is raising hopes that it might help eradicate the disease, even though the treatment can cause a dangerous side effect.

    Called tafenoquine, the drug targets the parasite that causes relapsing malaria. Plasmodium vivax infects an estimated 8.5 million people, mainly in Asia and Latin America. Each time...

    08/09/2018 - 10:00 Health, Microbes, Genetics
  • News

    Researchers say CRISPR edits to a human embryo worked. But critics still doubt it

    When researchers announced last year that they had edited human embryos to repair a damaged gene that can lead to heart failure, critics called the report into question.

    Now new evidence confirms that the gene editing was successful, reproductive and developmental biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov and colleagues report August 8 in Nature. “All of our conclusions were basically right,”...

    08/08/2018 - 14:45 Genetics, Science & Society
  • News

    The debate over people’s pathway into the Americas heats up

    Despite recently getting a cold shoulder from some researchers, a long-standing idea that North America’s first settlers entered the continent via an ice-free inland corridor boasts more scientific support than any other proposal, an international team says.

    New World colonizers from Asia may also have traveled by canoe down the Northwest Pacific Coast and perhaps much farther, as...

    08/08/2018 - 14:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Genetics
  • News

    The first detailed map of red foxes’ DNA may reveal domestication secrets

    For nearly 60 years, scientists in Siberia have bred silver foxes in an attempt to replay how domestication occurred thousands of years ago. Now, in a first, researchers have compiled the genetic instruction book, or genome, of Vulpes vulpes, the red fox species that includes the silver-coated variant. This long-awaited study of the foxes’ DNA may reveal genetic changes that drove...

    08/06/2018 - 11:00 Genetics, Animals
  • News

    The ‘language gene’ didn’t give humans a big leg up in evolution

    Humans’ gift of gab probably wasn’t the evolutionary boon that scientists once thought.   

    There’s no evidence that FOXP2, sometimes called “the language gene,” gave humans such a big evolutionary advantage that it was quickly adopted across the species, what scientists call a selective sweep. That finding, reported online August 2 in Cell, follows years of debate about the role of FOXP2...

    08/03/2018 - 07:00 Genetics, Molecular Evolution, Ancestry
  • News in Brief

    Indonesia’s pygmies didn’t descend from hobbits, DNA analysis suggests

    Hobbits took a separate evolutionary path to becoming small than did short, modern-day humans living on the same Indonesian island, a new DNA analysis suggests.

    Rampasasa pygmies residing near a cave on Flores that previously yielded small-bodied hobbit fossils inherited DNA from Neandertals and Denisovans but not from any other now-extinct hominid, an international team of researchers...

    08/02/2018 - 14:00 Genetics, Anthropology
  • Science & the Public

    Most Americans think it’s OK to tweak a baby’s genes to prevent disease

    Only a day after the first test-tube baby turned 40, a poll about American’s attitudes toward tweaking unborn babies’ genes reveals the hopes and hesitations of being on the brink of the latest reproductive era.

    Americans generally favor gene editing, but only for heading off diseases. Boosting intelligence would be “taking medical technology too far,” survey respondents said. (Not that...

    07/26/2018 - 18:26 Genetics, Science & Society
  • News

    Here’s why wounds heal faster in the mouth than in other skin

    Mouth wounds heal faster than injuries to other parts of the skin, and now scientists are learning how the mouth performs its speedy repairs.

    Some master regulators of gene activity work overtime in the mouth to heal wounds without scarring, researchers report July 25 in Science Translational Medicine. Those regulators — proteins known as SOX2, PITX1, PITX2 and PAX9 — are active in skin...

    07/25/2018 - 14:00 Genetics, Cells, Immune Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers share their experiences with DNA ancestry tests

    Hacking it

    Fleets of autonomous taxis coordinated by an algorithm could curb traffic congestion and vehicle pollution, Maria Temming reported in “Fleets of self-driving taxis could be choreographed to cut traffic” (SN: 6/23/18, p. 5).

    “And what happens when the system gets hacked?” asked online reader RME76048. “Sounds like a primo target for an ambitious hacker.”

    A control...

    07/25/2018 - 07:15 Technology, Physics, Genetics
  • 50 years ago, scientists took baby steps toward selecting sex

    Toward preselected sex

    Robert Edwards and Richard Gardner of Cambridge University … say they have been able to remove rabbit embryos … then reimplant only the blastocysts destined to develop into the chosen sex. The implications are obvious and enormous. If this procedure could be extended easily to man there might, for instance, be imbalances, even fads, in the selection by parents...

    07/20/2018 - 13:49 Genetics, Technology, Science & Society