Anthropology

More Stories in Anthropology

  1. eagle
    Archaeology

    A toe bone hints that Neandertals used eagle talons as jewelry

    An ancient eagle toe bone elevates the case for the use of symbolic bird-of-prey pendants among Neandertals, researchers say.

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  2. Easter Island statues
    Humans

    Quarrying stone for Easter Island statues made soil more fertile for farming

    Easter Island’s Polynesian society grew crops in soil made especially fertile by the quarrying of rock for large, humanlike statues, a study suggests.

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  3. Denisovan girl drawing
    Humans

    Ancient DNA reveals the first glimpse of what a Denisovan may have looked like

    A controversial technique reconstructs a teenage Denisovan’s physical appearance from genetics.

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  4. St. Catherines Island
    Humans

    An island grave site hints at far-flung ties among ancient Americans

    Great Lakes and southeastern coastal hunter-gatherers had direct contact around 4,000 years ago, a study suggests.

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  5. Boy from Azerbaijan
    Humans

    Culture helps shape when babies learn to walk

    The culture in which a baby is raised can accelerate or slow down the development of early motor skills. Does it matter?

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  6. human skeletons
    Humans

    DNA indicates how ancient migrations shaped South Asian languages and farming

    Farming in the region may have sprung up locally, while herders from afar sparked language changes.

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  7. Denisovan finger bone
    Anthropology

    This ancient Denisovan finger bone is surprisingly humanlike

    Despite Neandertal ties, extinct hominids called Denisovans had a touching link to humans, a new study finds.

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  8. hominid skull reconstruction
    Humans

    A 3.8-million-year-old skull reveals the face of Lucy’s possible ancestors

    A fossilized hominid skull found in an Ethiopian desert illuminates the earliest-known Australopithecus species.

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  9. Primate skull in hand
    Anthropology

    A tiny skull fossil suggests primate brain areas evolved separately

    Digital reconstruction of a fossilized primate skull reveals that odor and vision areas developed independently starting 20 million years ago or more.

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