Climate

More Stories in Climate

  1. Pyrocumulonimbus clouds
    Earth

    The worst wildfires can send smoke high enough to affect the ozone layer

    Pyrocumulonimbus clouds can send soot and other damaging particles 23 kilometers into the air

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  2. cod fisherman
    Climate

    Mercury levels in fish are rising despite reduced emissions

    Climate change and overfishing can increase how much mercury accumulates in fish, counteracting efforts to reduce human-caused emissions.

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  3. Miami flooding
    Science & Society

    How the 5 riskiest U.S. cities for coastal flooding are preparing for rising tides

    The five U.S. cities most at risk of coastal flooding from rising sea levels are in various stages of preparedness.

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  4. Boston flooding sign
    Science & Society

    With nowhere to hide from rising seas, Boston prepares for a wetter future

    Boston has armed itself with a science-driven master plan to protect itself from increasingly inevitable storm surges and rising seas.

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  5. Antarctica
    Earth

    A new map is the best view yet of how fast Antarctica is shedding ice

    Stitching together data from several satellite missions allowed scientists to create the most comprehensive map of Antarctic ice flow ever.

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  6. arctic wildfires
    Climate

    The Arctic is burning and Greenland is melting, thanks to record heat

    A heat wave is melting Greenland’s ice and fueling blazes across the Arctic that are pumping record amounts of carbon dioxide into the air.

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  7. hot subway
    Climate

    How today’s global warming is unlike the last 2,000 years of climate shifts

    Temperatures at the end of the 20th century were hotter almost everywhere on the planet than in the previous two millennia.

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  8. forest
    Ecosystems

    Planting trees could buy more time to fight climate change than thought

    Earth has nearly a billion hectares suitable for new forests to start trapping carbon, a study finds.

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  9. Noctilucent clouds
    Earth

    Night-shining ‘noctilucent’ clouds have crept south this summer

    Clouds high in the atmosphere that catch the sun’s rays even after sundown may be seen farther from the poles due to an increase in moisture in the air.

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