Neuroscience

More Stories in Neuroscience

  1. Map of the heart's 'brain'
    Neuroscience

    A new 3-D map illuminates the ‘little brain’ within the heart

    Microscopy and genetic studies yield a comprehensive map of the nerve cells found in the heart of a rat.

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  2. Neuroscience

    How coronavirus stress may scramble our brains

    The pandemic has made clear thinking a real struggle. But researchers say knowing how stress affects the brain can help people cope.

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  3. man standing at a screen drawing a letter with his fingers
    Neuroscience

    Blind people can ‘see’ letters traced directly onto their brains

    Arrays of electrodes can trace shapes onto people’s brains, creating bursts of light that people can “see.”

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  4. Simon game
    Neuroscience

    A game based on Simon shows how people mentally rehearse new information

    Signs of learning echo through people’s resting brains.

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  5. brain
    Neuroscience

    ‘The Idea of the Brain’ explores the evolution of neuroscience

    Despite advances, much about the human brain is still a mystery, a new book shows

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  6. Mouse expression illustration
    Neuroscience

    Mice’s facial expressions can reveal a wide range of emotions

    Pleasure, pain, fear and other feelings can be reflected in mice’s faces, sophisticated computational analyses show.

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  7. longfin inshore squid
    Genetics

    Squid edit their genetic material in a uniquely weird place

    Some squids’ seeming ability to edit RNA on the fly could help scientists develop a technique much like the DNA-editing tool CRISPR, but for RNA.

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  8. artificial neural network illustration
    Artificial Intelligence

    An AI that mimics how mammals smell recognizes scents better than other AI

    An artificial intelligence modeled after the neural circuitry in mammalian brains can keep learning new aromas without forgetting others.

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  9. EEG electrodes on the heads of three different people
    Science & Society

    New electrodes can better capture brain waves of people with natural hair

    Electrodes weren’t designed for people with thick, curly hair. A redesign is needed, says engineer Pulkit Grover.

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