Scicurious

A peek behind the science curtain

  1. Platynereis dumerilii
    Neuroscience

    Melatonin and the watery beginnings of sleep

    The tiny zooplankton Platynereis dumerilii use melatonin just as much as we do, suggesting that the origins of sleeplike behavior may lie under the sea.

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  2. artificial sweetener packets
    Health & Medicine

    The sour side of artificial sweeteners

    A new study found that saccharin alters the gut microbiome of mice and produces insulin resistance, but it’s not the first to show the sour side of diet drinks.

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  3. Psychology

    Balancing the excitation and inhibition tightrope in depression

    A new study looks at how a balance of positive and negative inputs in the lateral habenula might relate to disappointment and depression.

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  4. man about to step on a banana peel
    Science & Society

    Banana peel slipperiness wins IgNobel prize in physics

    Cartoons taught us that banana peels make for a slick trip to the floor, but scientists decided to find out just how slippery they could be.

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  5. salad
    Psychology

    Training the overweight brain to abstain

    A new study shows that brain changes are associated with a weight-loss behavioral intervention, but it may be a while before we can train our brains to prefer peppers over pork chops.

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  6. a person sleeping
    Psychology

    In PTSD, a good night’s sleep means feeling safe

    Studies of PTSD in rats have usually focused on fear and trauma. But a new study in humans shows that learning about safety may be important as well.

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  7. big brown bat
    Neuroscience

    To study attention, pay attention to bats

    Studying how bats’ brains find prey using echolocation could have implications for the way human brains pay attention.

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  8. Psychology

    Hypothesis on evolution of PMS attracts hostility

    A new hypothesis states that PMS is evolutionarily useful for making women leave an infertile partnership. But other scientists question whether the hypothesis is reasonable or, in fact, even necessary.

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  9. Wild mouse
    Health & Medicine

    Taking lab mice back to their roots

    Lab mice are incredibly useful for biomedical research. But they are also incredibly inbred. A new study shows that bringing wild mouse traits back could help uncover new links between genes and behavior.

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  10. transparent mouse
    Health & Medicine

    Clearing up anatomy with a see-through mouse

    A new method begins with a mouse or rat and ends with a transparent body, where details can be visualized all the way to the DNA. Here’s how it works.

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  11. retinal ganglion cell
    Neuroscience

    For neurons, birthday matters

    How brain cells make their connections during development still isn’t well understood. A new study shows that in the eye, a neuron’s birthday makes a difference in how it finds its targets.

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  12. illustration of drugs on the brain
    Psychology

    Addiction showcases the brain’s flexibility

    People with substance abuse disorders are not just chasing a high. Their brains are adapting to the presence of drug, evidence of humans’ impressive neural plasticity.

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