Animals

  1. Animals

    Poison birds copy ‘don’t touch’ feathers

    A subspecies of one of New Guinea's poisonous pitohui birds may be mimicking a toxic neighbor, according to a new genetic analysis.

    By
  2. Animals

    Shrimps spew bubbles as hot as the sun

    With the snap of a claw, a pinkie-size ocean shrimp generates a collapsing air bubble that's hot enough to emit faint light.

    By
  3. Animals

    Meerkat pups grow fatter with extra adults

    Meerkat pups growing up in large, cooperative groups are heftier because there are more adults to entreat for food.

    By
  4. Animals

    Shhh! Is that scrape a caterpillar scrap?

    A series of staged conflicts reveals the first known acoustic duels in caterpillars.

    By
  5. Animals

    Gimme, Gimme, Gimme!

    Hungry chicks cheeping in their nest have inspired a whole branch of scientific inquiry.

    By
  6. Animals

    Social Cats

    Who says cats aren't social? And other musings from scientists who study cats in groups.

    By
  7. Animals

    Even deep down, the right whales don’t sink

    A right whale may weigh some 70 tons, but unlike other marine mammals studied so far, it tends to float rather than sink at great depths.

    By
  8. Animals

    It’s a snake! No, a fish. An octopus?

    An as-yet-unnamed species of octopus seems to be protecting itself by impersonating venomous animals from sea snakes to flatfish.

    By
  9. Animals

    Big woodpeckers trash others’ homes

    Pileated woodpeckers destroy in an afternoon the nesting cavities that take endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers 6 years to excavate.

    By
  10. Animals

    When rare species eat endangered ones

    To cut down on their salmon smolt catch, Caspian terns were encouraged to move from one island to another in the Columbia River.

    By
  11. Animals

    Oops. New feathers turn out lousy

    Going to the trouble of molting doesn't really get rid of a bird's lice after all.

    By
  12. Animals

    Stinking decorations protect nests

    The common waxbill's habit of adorning its nests with fur plucked from carnivore scat turns out to discourage attacks from predators.

    By