Animals

  1. mimic poison frog
    Neuroscience

    A frog study may point to where parenting begins in the brain

    Two brain regions, including one active in mammal parents, lit up with activity in both male and female poison frogs when caring for their tadpoles.

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  2. zombie ant
    Animals

    A deadly fungus gives ‘zombie’ ants a case of lockjaw

    Clues left on infected ant jaws may reveal how the ‘zombie-ant-fungus’ contracts ant muscles to make their death grip.

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  3. protein microscopy
    Genetics

    This gene may help worms live longer, but not healthier

    Antiaging therapies may have trade-offs, research on worms suggests.

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  4. bat with WNS
    Life

    Spraying bats with ‘good’ bacteria may combat deadly white nose syndrome

    Nearly half of bats infected with white nose syndrome survived through winter after being spritzed with antifungal bacteria, a small study finds.

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  5. right whales
    Animals

    Southern right whale moms and calves may whisper to evade orcas

    Mother-calf whale pairs call to each other quietly to stay in touch while avoiding attracting the attention of predators, a study suggests.

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  6. fish brain activity
    Neuroscience

    Both fish and humans have REM-like sleep

    Sleeping zebrafish have brain and body activity similar to snoozing mammals, suggesting that sleep evolved at least 450 million years ago.

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  7. beetles
    Animals

    Ground beetle genitals have the genetic ability to get strange. They don’t

    A new look at the genetics of sex organs finds underpinnings of conflicts over genital size.

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  8. Ecosystems

    Moonlight shapes how some animals move, grow and even sing

    The moon’s light influences lion prey behavior, dung beetle navigation, fish growth, mass migrations and birdsong.

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  9. a photo of a crocodile with its mouth open
    Animals

    Some ancient crocodiles may have chomped on plants instead of meat

    Fossil teeth of extinct crocodyliforms suggest that some ate plants and that herbivory evolved at least three times in crocs of the Mesozoic Era.

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  10. Nazca lines
    Archaeology

    Peru’s famous Nazca Lines may include drawings of exotic birds

    Pre-Inca people depicted winged fliers from far away in landscape art.

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  11. Massospora cicadina
    Life

    These fungi drug cicadas with psilocybin or amphetamine to make them mate nonstop

    Massospora fungi use a compound found in magic mushrooms or an amphetamine to drive infected cicadas to mate and mate and mate.

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  12. capuchin monkey
    Archaeology

    Capuchin monkeys’ stone-tool use has evolved over 3,000 years

    A Brazilian archaeological site reveals capuchins’ long history of practical alterations to pounding implements, researchers say.

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