Neuroscience

More Stories in Neuroscience

  1. forager bees
    Neuroscience

    Honeybee brain upgrades may help the insects find food

    Changes in honeybee neurons may help the insects decode their fellow foragers’ waggle dances.

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  2. strep virus brain illustration
    Health & Medicine

    How strep throat may spark OCD and anxiety in some kids

    A potential link between strep throat and sudden mental disorders in children raises questions about how infections can alter the brain.

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  3. brain
    Neuroscience

    What human and mouse brains do and don’t have in common

    A large comparison of human and mouse brain cells highlights key differences that could have implications for research on depression or Alzheimer’s.

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  4. person reading
    Neuroscience

    Imaging scans show where symbols turn to letters in the brain

    Scientists watched brain activity in a region where reading takes root, and saw a hierarchy of areas that give symbols both sound and meaning.

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  5. brain images
    Life

    Electrodes show a glimpse of memories emerging in a brain

    Nerve cells in an important memory center in the brain sync their firing and create fast ripples of activity seconds before a recollection resurfaces.

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  6. nerve cells
    Life

    Alzheimer’s targets brain cells that help people stay awake

    Nerve cells in the brain that are tied to wakefulness are destroyed in people with Alzheimer’s, a finding that may refocus dementia research.

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  7. football players
    Humans

    Even without concussions, just one football season may damage players’ brains

    A group of college football players underwent brain scans after a season of play. The results suggest the sport could impact neural signaling.

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  8. plants
    Neuroscience

    Plants don’t have feelings and aren’t conscious, a biologist argues

    The rise of the field of “plant neurobiology” has this scientist and his colleagues pushing back.

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  9. mimic poison frog
    Neuroscience

    A frog study may point to where parenting begins in the brain

    Two brain regions, including one active in mammal parents, lit up with activity in both male and female poison frogs when caring for their tadpoles.

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