Paleontology

More Stories in Paleontology

  1. illustration of crocodile ancestors walking on two legs
    Life

    Fossil footprints show some crocodile ancestors walked on two legs

    The 106-million-year-old tracks suggest that other puzzling nearby fossils were also likely made by a bipedal croc ancestor, not a giant pterosaur.

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  2. ancient brachiopod illustration
    Life

    These tube-shaped creatures may be the earliest known parasites

    Fossils from over 500 million years ago might be the first known example of parasitism in the fossil record, though the evidence isn’t conclusive.

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  3. anchovy ancestor
    Paleontology

    Saber-toothed anchovy relatives hunted in the sea 50 million years ago

    Unlike today’s plankton-eating anchovies with tiny teeth, ancient anchovy kin had lower jaw of sharp spikes paired with a single giant sabertooth.

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  4. gondwanatherian
    Paleontology

    A ‘crazy beast’ from the time of dinosaurs belongs to an obscure mammal group

    Paleontologists have finally matched a bizarre fossil, Adalatherium hui, to an obscure group of ancient mammals called gondwanatherians.

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  5. illustration of Spinosaurus
    Paleontology

    Spinosaurus fossil tail suggests dinosaurs were swimmers after all

    Unique among known dinosaurs, Spinosaurus had a finlike tail, which the predator may have used to propel itself through the water.

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  6. Paleontology

    Deep caves are a rich source of dinosaur prints for this paleontologist

    Several deep caves in France are proving to be a surprising source of dinosaur tracks.

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  7. Seymour Island landscape
    Paleontology

    The first frog fossil from Antarctica has been found

    An ancient amphibian from Antarctica gives new insight into when the continent got so cold.

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  8. Ucayalipithecus primate teeth
    Paleontology

    Two primate lineages crossed the Atlantic millions of years ago

    Peruvian primate fossils point to a second ocean crossing by a now-extinct group roughly 35 million to 32 million years ago.

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  9. Dineobellator notohesperus illustration
    Paleontology

    Fossils of a new dromaeosaur date to the end of the Age of Dinosaurs

    Fossils from a new dromaeosaur recovered from New Mexico suggest these fierce predators were diversifying up to the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.

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