Search Results for: Cell

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10,000+ results
  1. A photo of a small hand reaching out with an index finger to touch the long green leaf of a plant near the ground.
    Life

    How plant ‘muscles’ fold up a mimosa leaf fast

    A mimosa plant revs up tiny clumps of specially shaped cells that collapse its leaflets, though why isn’t clear.

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  2. an organoid made of human nerve cells, shown in bright green, on the upper left side of a rat brain, shown in dark green
    Neuroscience

    Clumps of human nerve cells thrived in rat brains

    New results suggest that environment matters for the development of brain organoids, 3-D nerve cell clusters that grow and mimic the human brain.

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  3. A photo of the Golden Gate Bridge on a bright sunny day
    Physics

    Crowdsourced cell phone data could keep bridges safe and strong

    Accelerometers and GPS sensors in smartphones could provide frequent, real-time data on bridge vibrations, and alert engineers to changes in integrity

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  4. A microscopic image of the bacterial species Streptococcus salivarius.
    Health & Medicine

    Too much of this bacteria in the nose may worsen allergy symptoms

    Hay fever sufferers have an overabundance of Streptococcus salivarius. The mucus-loving bacteria boost inflammation, causing an endlessly runny nose.

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  5. Electron micrograph of a macrophage
    Health & Medicine

    Need a fall read? ‘The Song of the Cell’ offers tales from biology and history

    Siddhartha Mukherjee’s new book, The Song of the Cell, explores the world of cell biology through the lens of scientists, doctors and patients.

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  6. This sleeping female glass frog tucks away most of her red blood cells while she sleeps. Her eggs are visible within her transparent ovaries.
    Life

    Sleeping glass frogs hide by storing most of their blood in their liver

    Glass frogs snoozing among leaves blend in by hiding almost all their red blood cells in their liver until the tiny animals wake up.

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  7. Marcos Simões-Costa portrait
    Life

    Marcos Simões-Costa asks how cells in the embryo get their identities

    Marcos Simões-Costa combines classic studies of developing embryos with the latest genomic techniques.

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  8. A photo of a California market squid hatchling
    Life

    Squid edit their RNA to keep cellular supply lines moving in the cold

    Squid change their RNA more often in the cold, producing motor proteins that keep cellular cargo on track.

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  9. An elderly male patient sits on a medical exam bed with his back to the camera and a medical professional holding a stethoscope to the patient's back.
    Health & Medicine

    The deadly VEXAS syndrome is more common than doctors thought

    The recently discovered inflammatory disease, VEXAS syndrome, typically occurs in men over 50, affecting nearly 1 in 4,000 in the United States.

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  10. An illustration of a man blowing his nose on a pink background with a giant box of tissues, red ski cap, and pills in the middle ground.
    Health & Medicine

    Why it’s easier to catch a cold, the flu or COVID in the winter

    Low humidity protects viruses and cold temperatures may blunt some immune responses, making viral infections like colds, flu and COVID-19 more likely.

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  11. Readers discuss swimming sperm, a fishing fox and more

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Pollution mucks up the lungs’ immune defenses over time

    A study of immune tissue in the lungs reports that particulate matter buildup from air pollution may impair respiratory immunity in older adults.

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