Search Results for: Chimpanzee

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945 results
  1. Life

    Bonobos, like humans, cooperate with unrelated members of other groups

    Cooperation between unrelated individuals in different groups without clear and immediate benefit was thought to be uniquely human. Its presence in bonobos may help explain its evolution.

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  2. Anthropology

    Surprisingly long-lived wild female chimps go through menopause

    Chimpanzees in Uganda are the first known example of wild, nonhuman primates experiencing the hormonal changes, raising questions about how menopause evolved.

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  3. Anthropology

    Ancient primates’ unchipped teeth hint that they ate mostly fruit

    Of more than 400 teeth collected, just 21 were chipped, suggesting that early primate diets were soft on their choppers.

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  4. Readers discuss marathoners’ myelin, menopausal chimps and more

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  5. Neuroscience

    What a look at more than 3,000 kinds of cells in the human brain tells us

    A wide-reaching look at the cells that build the brain, detailed in 21 studies, showcases the brain’s cellular diversity and clues about how it works.

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  6. Animals

    Cockatoos can tell when they need more than one tool to swipe a snack

    Cockatoos know when it will take a stick and a straw to nab a nut in a puzzle box. The birds join chimps as the only known nonhumans to use a tool kit.

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  7. Animals

    Fish can recognize themselves in photos, further evidence they may be self-aware

    Cleaner fish recognize themselves in mirrors and photos, suggesting that far more animals may be self-aware than previously thought.

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  8. Animals

    What parrots can teach us about human intelligence

    By studying the brains and behaviors of parrots, scientists hope to learn more about how humanlike intelligence evolves.

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  9. Good with tools? You may be a cockatoo

    Editor in chief Nancy Shute talks about smart animals, from tool-using cockatoos to "self-aware" fish.

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  10. Life

    Mammals that live in groups may live longer, longevity research suggests

    An analysis of nearly 1,000 mammal species reveals that the evolution of mammals’ social lives and life spans could be linked.

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  11. Humans

    Why humans have more voice control than any other primates

    Unlike all other studied primates, humans lack vocal membranes. That lets humans produce the sounds that language is built on, a new study suggests.

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  12. Animals

    Zoo gorillas use a weird new call that sounds like a sneezy cough

    A novel vocalization made by the captive great apes may help them draw human attention.

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