‘Wild Ways’ showcases need for wildlife corridors | Science News

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‘Wild Ways’ showcases need for wildlife corridors

Moving from here to there could save small, endangered populations, show argues

By
11:30am, April 7, 2016
Wildlife overpass in Banff National Park

HABITAT BRIDGES  “Wild Ways” examines efforts to create wildlife corridors to connect different populations of animals. The wildlife overpass shown above is in Canada’s Banff National Park. 

Thousands of national parks have been established around the world to preserve wildlife. But towns, farms, ranches and roads have grown up around many of these parks, creating islands of wilderness in a sea of humanity. If the creatures inside are to thrive, they need ways to travel between the islands, contends “Wild Ways,” a new documentary from the TV series NOVA.

Isolation can be especially troublesome for large predators, such as lions, that live alone or in small groups. In some areas of Africa, lions can move between populations to avoid inbreeding. But some lions, such as the few in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Crater, are cut off from other groups. In such populations, cubs are born smaller, die younger and are more susceptible to disease. And drought or overhunting could easily wipe them out, the show notes.

 

 

 

 

 

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