Museum mummies sport world’s oldest tattoo drawings | Science News

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Museum mummies sport world’s oldest tattoo drawings

Infrared photography reveals animals and symbolic designs from 5,000 years ago

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12:23pm, March 9, 2018

TATT MAN  Infrared imaging revealed that smudges on the upper-right arm of a naturally mummified Egyptian man are actually tattoos of a wild bull and a Barbary sheep. These oldest known picture tattoos date from at least 5,000 years ago.

Two human mummies housed at the British Museum in London for more than a century boast the world’s oldest known — and longest hidden — tattoos of figures and designs, a new investigation finds. These people lived in Egypt at or shortly before the rise of the first pharaoh around 5,100 years ago.

Radiocarbon analyses of hairs from the mummies date the bodies to between 3351 B.C. and 3017 B.C., says a team led by Egyptologist Renée Friedman of the University of Oxford and bioarchaeologist Daniel Antoine of the British Museum in London. Infrared photography revealed that smudges on a male mummy’s upper right arm depict a wild bull and a Barbary sheep, while a female mummy bears four S-shaped patterns on her right shoulder and a line with bent ends on her right arm. These animals and figures appear in Egyptian art from the same period, the researchers report online March 1 in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Both sets of tattoos — which

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