Orangutans take motherhood to extremes, nursing young for more than eight years | Science News

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Orangutans take motherhood to extremes, nursing young for more than eight years

Weaning has been tricky to observe in the wild, so researchers turned to lab tests

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2:46pm, May 17, 2017
baby orangutan

MOM’S A CHAMP  This baby orangutan could guzzle its mom’s milk for more than eight years, the longest of any wild mammal on record.

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The supermoms of the mammal world are big, shy redheads. Studying growth layers in orangutan teeth shows that mothers can nurse their youngsters for eight-plus years, a record for wild mammals.  

Teeth from a museum specimen of a young Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) don’t show signs of weaning until 8.1 years of age. And a Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii) was still nursing during the few months before it was killed at 8.8 years, researchers report May 17 in Science Advances.

Tests also show that youngsters periodically start to taper off their dependence on their mother’s milk and then, perhaps if solid food grows scarce, go back to what looks like an all-mom diet. Such on-again, off-again nursing cycles aren’t known in other wild mammals, says study coauthor Tanya Smith, an evolutionary anthropologist at

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