Search Content | Science News

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

Search Content

E.g., 06/26/2019
E.g., 06/26/2019
Your search has returned 25 images:
  • flask of beer and yeast
  • air pollution
  • Polypterus
Your search has returned 27 articles:
  • News

    The sun’s strongest flare in 11 years might help explain a solar paradox

    A series of rapid-fire solar flares is providing the first chance to test a new theory of why the sun releases its biggest outbursts when its activity is ramping down. Migrating bands of magnetism that meet at the sun’s equator may cause the biggest flares, even as the sun is going to sleep.

    A single complex sunspot called Active Region 2673 emitted seven bright flares — powerful bursts...

    09/11/2017 - 16:30 Astronomy, Particle Physics
  • News

    When a fungus invades the lungs, immune cells can tell it to self-destruct

    Immune cells can turn certain invaders on themselves, forcing them to prematurely self-destruct, researchers have discovered.

    In mice, when white blood cells in the lungs engulf spores of a common airborne fungus, these immune cells release an enzyme that sends the fungal cells into programmed cell death. That prevents the spores from setting up shop in the lungs and sparking a...

    09/07/2017 - 17:01 Immune Science, Health
  • News

    Brain chemical lost in Parkinson’s may contribute to its own demise

    The brain chemical missing in Parkinson’s disease may have a hand in its own death. Dopamine, the neurotransmitter that helps keep body movements fluid, can kick off a toxic chain reaction that ultimately kills the nerve cells that make it, a new study suggests.

    By studying lab dishes of human nerve cells, or neurons, derived from Parkinson’s patients, researchers found that a harmful...

    09/07/2017 - 14:12 Neuroscience, Biomedicine
  • News in Brief

    Why bats crash into windows

    View the video

    Walls can get the best of clumsy TV sitcom characters and bats alike.

    New lab tests suggest that smooth, vertical surfaces fool some bats into thinking their flight path is clear, leading to collisions and near misses.

    The furry fliers famously use sound to navigate — emitting calls and tracking the echoes to hunt for prey and locate obstacles. But some...

    09/07/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • News

    Woolly rhinos may have grown strange extra ribs before going extinct

    As time ran out for the woolly rhino, strange things happened. Before going extinct, some of the beasts faced an unusually high risk of growing bizarre ribs in their neck, a new study suggests. Those misplaced ribs might have signaled the animals’ impending demise.

    Scientists examined neck bones from 32 woolly rhinos and found indented spots on five of them where ribs had once attached...

    09/07/2017 - 11:00 Paleontology, Evolution, Physiology
  • Science Visualized

    Pollen hitches a ride on bees in all the right spots

    Bee bodies may be built just right to help pollen hitch a ride between flowers.

    For the first time, scientists have identified where and how much pollen is left behind on bees’ bodies after the insects groom themselves. These residual patches of pollen align with spots on bees’ bodies that touch flowers’ pollen-collecting reproductive parts, researchers report online September 6 in PLOS...

    09/06/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Plants
  • News in Brief

    Dark matter still remains elusive

    Patience is a virtue in the hunt for dark matter. Experiment after experiment has come up empty in the search — and the newest crop is no exception.

    Observations hint at the presence of an unknown kind of matter sprinkled throughout the cosmos. Several experiments are focused on the search for one likely dark matter candidate: weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs (SN: 11/12/16...

    09/06/2017 - 08:00 Particle Physics
  • News

    Zika could one day help combat deadly brain cancer

    Zika’s damaging neurological effects might someday be enlisted for good — to treat brain cancer.

    In human cells and in mice, the virus infected and killed the stem cells that become a glioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor, but left healthy brain cells alone. Jeremy Rich, a regenerative medicine scientist at the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues report the findings...

    09/05/2017 - 16:54 Cancer, Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • Teaser

    Moons of Uranus face future collision

    If you could put Uranus’ moon Cressida in a gigantic tub of water, it would float.

    Cressida is one of at least 27 moons that circle Uranus. Robert Chancia of the University of Idaho in Moscow and colleagues calculated Cressida’s density and mass using visible variations in an inner ring of Uranus as the planet passed in front of a distant star. The moon’s density is 0.86 grams per cubic...

    09/01/2017 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Minuscule jitters may hint at quantum collapse mechanism

    A tiny, shimmying cantilever wiggles a bit more than expected in a new experiment. The excess jiggling of the miniature, diving board–like structure might hint at why the strange rules of quantum mechanics don’t apply in the familiar, “classical” world. But that potential hint is still a long shot: Other sources of vibration are yet to be fully ruled out, so more experiments are needed.

    ...

    09/01/2017 - 11:05 Quantum Physics