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Your search has returned 1802 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Here’s how to use DNA to find elusive sharks

    Pulling DNA out of bottles of seawater collected from reefs has revealed some of what biologists are calling the “dark diversity” of sharks.

    Physicists have their dark matter, known from indirect evidence since humans can’t see it. Dark diversity for biologists means species they don’t see in some reef, forest or other habitat, though predictions or older records say the creatures could...

    05/07/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Genetics, Conservation
  • 50 years ago, starving tumors of oxygen proposed as weapon in cancer fight

    Starve the tumor, not the cell

    Animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transplanted tumors release a chemical into the host’s bloodstream that causes the host to produce blood vessels to supply the tumor.… If such a factor can be identified in human cancers … it might be possible to prevent the vascularization of tumors. Since tumors above a certain small size require...

    05/04/2018 - 11:00 Cancer, Biomedicine, Cells
  • News

    An enzyme involved in cancer and aging gets a close-up

    Like a genetic handyman, an elusive enzyme deep inside certain cells repairs the tips of chromosomes, which fray as cells divide. It’s prized by rapidly dividing cells – like stem cells and tumor cells – and by scientists on the hunt for cancer and other disease therapies.

    Now researchers have the best picture yet of this enzyme, called telomerase. Using cryo-electron microscopy,...

    05/04/2018 - 10:00 Health, Cells, Cancer
  • News

    Adapting to life in the north may have been a real headache

    In Finland, 88 percent of people have a genetic variation that increases their risk for migraines. But in people of Nigerian descent, that number drops to 5 percent.

    Coincidence? Maybe. But a new study suggests that, thousands of years ago, that particular genetic mutation increased in frequency in northern populations because it somehow made people better suited to handle cold...

    05/03/2018 - 14:02 Genetics, Health
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers puzzled by particle physics and a papal decree

    Particle particulars

    Physicists are ramping up their search for neutrinoless double beta decay, which could help explain why there is more matter in the universe than antimatter, Emily Conover reported in “The quest to identify the nature of the neutrino’s alter ego is heating up” (SN: 3/17/18, p. 14).

    Reader F L Stiles wondered how this decay could explain a surplus of matter. “It...

    05/02/2018 - 07:00 Particle Physics, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    New genetic details may help roses come up smelling like, well, roses

    There’s new hope for making modern roses smell sweeter than the florist paper they’re wrapped in.

    By decoding the genetics of an heirloom variety, a fragrant pink China rose called “Old Blush,” an international team of researchers has uncovered some new targets to tweak. That roster of genes plus an analysis of scent revealed at least 22 previously uncharacterized biochemical steps the...

    04/30/2018 - 11:00 Plants, Genetics
  • News

    New genetic sleuthing tools helped track down the Golden State Killer suspect

    Using DNA to find a killer sounds easy: Upload some DNA to a database, get a match and — bingo — suspect found. But it took new genetic sleuthing tools to track down the man suspected of being the Golden State Killer.

    Investigators have confirmed they used a public genealogy database, GEDmatch, to connect crime scene evidence to distant relatives of Joseph James DeAngelo. The 72-year-old...

    04/29/2018 - 09:49 Genetics, Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    Genetically modified plant may boost supply of a powerful malaria drug

    Genetic modifications to a plant that makes artemisinin, a key compound used in malaria drugs, more than tripled the amount of the ingredient naturally produced in leaves.

    Previous attempts to genetically engineer Artemisia annua to increase the yield of artemisinin had failed. So Kexuan Tang, a plant scientist at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and colleagues determined A. annua’s entire...

    04/24/2018 - 14:56 Plants, Genetics, Immune Science
  • Science Ticker

    Cicadas on different schedules can hybridize

    Every few years, a buzz fills the air in the southeastern United States as adolescent cicadas crawl out from the soil to molt and make babies. After a childhood spent sipping tree sap underground, some species emerge every 13 years, others every 17 years, rarely overlapping. Yet somehow in this giant cicada orgy, hybridization happens between species that should be out of sync.

    ...

    04/20/2018 - 17:00 Genetics, Animals
  • News in Brief

    Larger spleens may help ‘sea nomads’ stay underwater longer

    In turquoise waters off the Indonesian coast, evolutionary geneticist Melissa Ilardo watched as the diver, wearing handmade, wooden goggles, spotted a giant clam meters below and darted down to retrieve it.

    The diver was one of the Bajau people of Southeast Asia, known for holding their breath for long periods while spearing fish and gathering other seafood. During a typical day, these “...

    04/19/2018 - 15:04 Physiology, Genetics