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Your search has returned 166 articles:
  • Feature

    Restoring Scents

    Betty (not her real name) remembers the day 9 years ago when she fully experienced an orange. As she split the fruit's skin, citrus scents sprayed into the air and the 51-year-old woman experienced a sensory epiphany: "Whoa! This is an orange. My God, this is what an orange smells like."

    Even now, she says, recalling that day "makes me tear up...

    07/02/2007 - 11:49 Biomedicine
  • News

    Slimming on oolong

    Without skimping on portions, rats eating diets including oolong tea gain less weight than those dining teafree, a new study finds. The tea apparently impairs the body's ability to absorb fat.

    The finding supports a weight-control strategy—oolong consumption—advocated by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, note Lauren E. Budd and her colleagues at the University of California...

    05/15/2007 - 15:09 Nutrition
  • News

    A smart pill for seniors?

    From Washington, D.C., at the Experimental Biology 2007 Conference

    Many people approaching retirement age find that memories fade and quick-wittedness flags. Scientists at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell have formulated what they call a "smart pill" to optimize brain health in such people. In pilot trials, its combination of dietary supplements boosted performance on simple...

    05/08/2007 - 14:49 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Crusty Chemistry

    Want to make a piece of pizza healthier? Try using whole-wheat dough. Give it a full 2 days to rise, and then cook the tomato pie a little longer and hotter than usual. That was the recipe shared last week by researchers at the American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago.

    Jeffrey Moore and Liangli Lucy Yu of the University of Maryland at College Park have been experimenting...

    04/03/2007 - 19:28 Nutrition
  • News

    Old plants were lost in the grass

    An obscure family of small, narrow-leaved water plants that have for years been classified as oddball relatives of grasses turns out to represent one of the most ancient surviving lineages of flowering plants, researchers say.

    These plants, the Hydatellaceae, belong with water lilies near the base of the family tree of flowering plants, say Sean Graham of the University of...

    03/27/2007 - 19:12 Plants
  • Feature

    Herbal Herbicides

    Certain plants are picky about the company they keep. Once established, walnuts and some sandy shrubs, for instance, create a virtually barren border of ground around them. Many other plants aren't quite so antisocial. They permit numerous species into their neighborhoods, while barring a few plant types.

    Chemical defenses play...

    03/13/2007 - 10:44 Agriculture
  • News

    Mafia Cowbirds: Do they muscle birds that don't play ball?

    Cowbirds in Illinois that sneak their eggs into other birds' nests retaliate violently if their scam gets foiled, researchers say.

    The brown-headed cowbirds of North America outsource nest building and chick raising. Female cowbirds dart into other birds' nests, quickly lay eggs, and rush away. The nest owners are left to care for big, demanding...

    03/07/2007 - 11:56 Animals
  • News

    Plastics ingredient disrupts fetal-egg development

    A common estrogen-mimicking chemical can damage eggs while an animal is still in the womb, researchers report.

    Bisphenol A is found in polycarbonate plastics—those used to make baby bottles and hard-shell water bottles—and in the lining of food cans. The chemical also turns up in human tissues at concentrations of several parts per billion.

    Earlier research had linked bisphenol A...

    01/30/2007 - 19:52
  • News

    Alien Alert: Shrimpy invader raises big concerns

    In November, an unusual swarm of tiny critters caught the attention of a crewmember on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration boat docked in a Lake Michigan channel. He asked Steven Pothoven of NOAA's Great Lakes environmental field station at Muskegon, Mich., what the critters were.

    "I could see they weren't fish, so I netted some," the biologist recalls. Under...

    01/10/2007 - 10:30 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Red Heat Might Improve Green Tea

    Most tea drinkers don't give much thought to how tea leaves are processed prior to arriving in a tin or tea bag. However, a Korean team of food scientists has. Realizing that many people are trying to consume more of certain tea-derived antioxidants—especially compounds called catechins—the researchers wondered whether concentrations of those chemicals might be affected by tea-leaf handling....

    12/07/2006 - 01:21 Nutrition