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Your search has returned 80 articles:
  • News

    Macho Moms: Perchlorate pollutant masculinizes fish

    Known largely as a component of rocket fuel, perchlorate is a pollutant that often turns up in soil and water. In dozens of studies, it has perturbed thyroid-hormone concentrations, which can affect growth and neurological development. Data from fish now indicate that perchlorate can also disrupt sexual development.

    Some of the changes were so dramatic that scientists initially...

    08/09/2006 - 10:53 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • Feature

    Amphibious Ancestors

    Imagine a scale-covered fish that uses fleshy limbs that end in fins to haul itself out of the water. Its mosaic of body features also includes sturdy ribs, the first vertebrate neck, and both gills and lungs. Paleontologists recently unearthed fossils of such a creature, which met their expectations for a proposed missing link between fish and the earliest land vertebrates. These relics...

    06/13/2006 - 10:05 Paleontology
  • News

    Boyish Brains: Plastic chemical alters behavior of female mice

    Exposure to the main ingredient of polycarbonate plastics can modify brain formation in female mouse fetuses and make the lab animals, later in life, display a typically male behavior pattern, scientists have announced.

    The chemical, bisphenol-A, is measurable in 95 percent of U.S. residents, according to past research. The chemical mimics the hormone estrogen, which in mammalian...

    05/03/2006 - 10:49
  • Food for Thought

    Meat Poses Exaggerated Cancer Risk for Some People

    Last year, the federal government's National Toxicology Program confirmed what many researchers had long been reporting: The heterocyclic amines that form in overcooked meat can trigger colon cancer in animals and probably do the same in people. Now, researchers studying mice have identified a gene that is needed to keep individual animals from becoming especially vulnerable to these...

    03/22/2006 - 16:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fooling the Satiety Meter (with recipe)

    Want to lose weight without counting calories? A new study finds that the easiest strategy might be reducing a meal's energy density—calories per ounce of food. When volunteers were offered such density-diminished meals, they rated the fare as filling—and as palatable—as they had full-calorie versions of the same foods.

    Smaller portions also curbed how much someone...

    02/16/2006 - 15:33 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Squirt Alert

    As scientific adviser to a group of Maine watermen, ecologist Larry Harris had heard his share of stories. But one tale, told to him 2 years ago, proved unforgettable. A fisherman related how he had been hauling up a dredge used to scout for scallops in nearby Cobscook Bay when he snagged something novel: a life form resembling blobs of pancake batter.

    In all his...

    12/18/2005 - 18:25 Ecology
  • News

    Feminized cod on the high seas

    From Baltimore, at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

    Male cod in the open ocean are producing vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein ordinarily made only by females.

    Vitellogenin "is a highly specific indicator of a fish's exposure to estrogens"—female sex hormones—as well as to pollutants that mimic them, notes Alexander P. Scott of the Centre for...

    12/04/2005 - 16:01 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Doesn't Mean Free of Pesticides

    In the United States, farmers treat most crops with pesticides to increase yields and the foods' eye appeal. Inevitably, studies have shown, traces of these pesticides remain on the food after harvest and are in the food we eat. However, switching to organically grown produce for as little as 2 weeks eliminated urine residues of potentially toxic organophosphate pesticides in children, a...

    11/23/2005 - 12:41 Agriculture