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Your search has returned 41 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fooling the Satiety Meter (with recipe)

    Want to lose weight without counting calories? A new study finds that the easiest strategy might be reducing a meal's energy density—calories per ounce of food. When volunteers were offered such density-diminished meals, they rated the fare as filling—and as palatable—as they had full-calorie versions of the same foods.

    Smaller portions also curbed...

    02/16/2006 - 15:33 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fruits and Veggies Limit Inflammatory Protein (with recipe)

    Over the past few years, many studies have linked an increased risk of debilitating illness—such as heart disease or diabetes—with chronically elevated blood concentrations of a protein typically associated with inflammation. In many cases, people with the indicated illnesses didn't even have a particularly level of inflammation. The good news: A new trial finds that eating plenty of fruits...

    12/01/2005 - 14:38 Nutrition
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • News

    Zinc boosts kids' learning

    Zinc supplements can help children learn certain tasks, a new federal study suggests. Because nearly all the children already had diets supplying the recommended amount of the mineral, the findings suggest that "the recommended intake may need an adjustment," says study leader James G. Penland of the Agriculture Department's Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, N.D.

    Penland...

    04/27/2005 - 11:30 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Improving Prospects for Functional Foods

    In the past decade, food and dietary-supplement manufacturers have created a new niche industry—one in which their goods do more than provide nutrition or gustatory pleasure. Designed to promote optimal health and reduce risk of disease, such products have come to be known as functional foods or nutraceuticals. Examples include St. John's wort tablets reputed to fight mild depression, calcium...

    03/30/2005 - 14:45 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Trimming with Tea

    Here's a new diet drink to help people shed pounds: oolong tea enriched with some of the antioxidant compounds that naturally occur in green tea. Men who drank this hybrid brew during a 3-month study in Japan lost 1.1 more kilograms in weight than did men drinking conventional oolong tea—with no other difference in their respective diets or exercise.

    The hybrid...

    02/09/2005 - 13:29 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • News

    Vitamin E targets dangerous inflammation

    People with diabetes face a high risk of heart attack and stroke. One apparent culprit is the chronic, low-grade inflammation that they develop. Megadoses of vitamin E can dramatically reduce that inflammation, a new study finds.

    Ishwarlal Jialal and Sridevi Devaraj of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas studied 47 men and women with adult-onset, or type II,...

    06/18/2004 - 16:31 Biomedicine