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Ancient human DNA suggests minimal interbreeding

Genetic analysis indicates Stone Age people mated infrequently with Neandertals and other close relatives

3:00pm, January 21, 2013

A 40,000-year-old human skeleton previously excavated in China has yielded genetic clues to Stone Age evolution.

Ancient DNA from cell nuclei and maternally inherited mitochondria indicates that this individual belonged to a population that eventually gave rise to many present-day Asians and Native Americans, says a team led by Qiaomei Fu and Svante Pääbo, evolutionary geneticists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

The partial skeleton, unearthed in Tianyuan Cave near Beijing in 2003, carries roughly the same small proportions of Neandertal and Denisovan genes as living Asians do (SN: 8/25/12, p. 22), the scientists report online January 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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