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Picture of primate common ancestor coming into focus

New family tree analysis points to nocturnal, rodent-sized, tree-climbing critter

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7:00am, October 29, 2016
primates

IN THE BEGINNING  By examining the behavior and ecology of modern primates from across the primate family tree, researchers hypothesized aspects of the earliest primate’s lifestyle.

SALT LAKE CITY — The earliest primate was a tiny, solitary tree dweller that liked the night life. Those are just some conclusions from new reconstructions of the primate common ancestor, presented October 27 at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Eva Hoffman, now a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, and colleagues at Yale University looked at behavioral and ecological data from 178 modern primate species. Examining patterns of traits across the primate family tree, the researchers inferred the most likely characteristics of ancestors at different branching points in the tree — all the way back to the common ancestor.

This ancient primate, which may have lived some 80 million to 70 million years ago, was probably no bigger than a guinea pig, lived alone and gave birth to one offspring at a time, the researchers suggest.

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