Earth

More Stories in Earth

  1. honeybee
    Animals

    Power lines may mess with honeybees’ behavior and ability to learn

    Under power lines, honeybees might suffer neurological effects from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

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  2. Monsoon season in China
    Earth

    Geology, not CO2, controlled monsoon intensity in Asia’s ancient past

    For millions of years, shifting geologic plates — not carbon dioxide levels —held the most sway over the intensity of Asia’s seasonal winds and rains.

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  3. Artisans carving rosewood
    Ecosystems

    Can forensics help keep endangered rosewood off the black market?

    Timber traffickers are plundering the world’s forests, but conservationists have a new set of tools to fight deforestation.

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  4. Geyserville
    Tech

    Here’s what it will take to adapt the power grid to higher wildfire risks

    Better sensing tech on power lines and reliance on more local power sources could help avoid vast power outages like those in California in October.

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  5. Climate

    A new estimate triples the number of people in the path of rising seas

    Sea level rise could flood coastal areas now home to 340 million to 480 million people by 2100, with Asia most affected, a study finds.

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  6. Earth

    Powerful storms may be causing offshore ‘stormquakes’

    A perfect-storm mixture of hurricane, ocean and seafloor topography can create distinct seismic signals called “stormquakes.”

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  7. humpback whale bubble net
    Animals

    Humpback whales use their flippers and bubble ‘nets’ to catch fish

    A study reveals new details of how humpback whales hunt using their flippers and a whirl of bubbles to capture fish.

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  8. A map of Gondwanaland
    Earth

    50 years ago, an Antarctic fossil pointed to Gondwanaland’s existence

    Fifty years ago, fossils from Antarctica helped seal the deal that the southern continents were once connected in one, giant landmass called Gondwanaland.

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  9. Ganges River
    Earth

    Too much groundwater pumping is draining many of the world’s rivers

    Too much groundwater use could push over half of pumped watersheds past an ecological tipping point by 2050, compromising aquatic ecosystems worldwide.

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