For Daily Use

  1. bag of salad greens
    Microbes

    Cut leaves in bagged salads help Salmonella grow

    Juice from torn-up leafy greens helps Salmonella spread in bagged salads.

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  2. People using wifi
    Tech

    Wi-Fi can help house distinguish between members

    Using Wi-Fi, computers could one day identify individual family members in a smart home.

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  3. peanut butter and jelly sandwich face down on the floor
    Health & Medicine

    It’s time to retire the five-second rule

    Wet food can slurp bacteria off the floor in less than a second.

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  4. cornea transplant
    Health & Medicine

    Cornea donation may have sex bias

    Women receiving a corneal transplant do better when their donors are female, new research finds.

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  5. ice freezer
    Microbes

    Thaw tests turn up dicey bagged ice

    Tests of bagged ice found that 19 percent exceeded recommended thresholds for bacterial contamination.

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  6. Stinkbugs
    Animals

    Eat your stinkbugs

    Prepared as a snack by some groups in southern Africa, the stinkbug Encosternum delegorguei is a good source of protein and antioxidants.

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  7. gas-sensing capsule
    Tech

    Pill measures gut gas

    A gas-sensing ingestible capsule tested in pigs could someday help doctors assess people’s gastrointestinal health.

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  8. campfire
    Physics

    Common campfire build confirmed as best

    A standard method for building fires, making the height about equal to the width, is the most efficient structure for stoking the hottest flames, calculations show.

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  9. Brazilian soccer players in 2014 World Cup
    Science & Society

    Here’s what game theory says about how to win in semifinals

    Game theory informs competitors facing off in a semifinal whether to go all out or save energy for the final.

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  10. People with big ears
    Psychology

    Big ears don’t necessarily come with baggage

    In a small study, adults judged children and teens with big ears as intelligent and likable.

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  11. Chocolate bars
    Neuroscience

    Cocoa antioxidant sweetens cognition in elderly

    Very high doses of antioxidants found in cocoa may prevent some types of cognitive decline in older adults. But that’s not an excuse to eat more chocolate.

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