Reprieve for reprogrammed stem cells | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.


News in Brief

Reprieve for reprogrammed stem cells

What could have been a stumbling block for using reprogrammed stem cells in the clinic may barely be a bump in the road

By
6:47pm, January 10, 2013

What could have been a stumbling block for using reprogrammed stem cells in the clinic may barely be a bump in the road. A study published in 2011 in Nature found that stem cells produced by reprogramming mouse skin cells get attacked when transplanted back into mice. Stem cells derived from embryos didn’t similarly rile the immune system. The finding was unexpected because reprogrammed stem cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, come from the mouse or person into whom they are transplanted, so the immune system shouldn’t recognize them as foreign. Now Masumi Abe of the Japanese National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba and colleagues have performed a more expansive version of the earlier study, examining 10 different types of iPS cells and seven types of embryonic stem cells to address the potential problem. Neither embryonic stem cells nor iPS cells provoked the immune system to attack to any significant degree when tran

This article is only available to Science News subscribers. Already a subscriber? Log in now. Or subscribe today for full access.

Get Science News headlines by e-mail.

More from Science News

From the Nature Index Paid Content