Wave-thumping ‘weather bomb’ storms send elusive S waves through Earth | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.


News

Wave-thumping ‘weather bomb’ storms send elusive S waves through Earth

High-tech detectors can now pick up weak tremors, help probe planet’s depths

By
2:00pm, August 25, 2016
Scotland storm

WEATHER BOMB  A Japanese seismic network detected a rare type of deep-Earth tremor originating from a swirling North Atlantic storm (seen here slamming Scotland’s coast) in December 2014.

How the seafloor quivers under an intense storm called a “weather bomb” could help reveal Earth’s innermost secrets.

Using a network of seismic sensors, researchers in Japan detected a rare type of deep-Earth tremor originating from a rapidly strengthening cyclone over the North Atlantic Ocean. Tracking how these newfound shakes ripple through the globe will help geoscientists map the materials that make up the planet’s depths, the researchers report August 26 in Science.

This article is available only to subscribing members. Join the Society today or Log in.

Get Science News headlines by e-mail.

More from Science News

From the Nature Index Paid Content