Archaeology

  1. Archaeology

    Saharan surprise

    A chance discovery in the Sahara leads to the excavation of a Stone Age cemetery containing remains from two lakeside cultures.

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  2. Archaeology

    Greeks followed a celestial Olympics

    A Greek gadget discovered more than a century ago in a 2,100-year-old shipwreck not only tracked the motion of heavenly bodies and predicted eclipses, but also functioned as a sophisticated calendar and mapped the four-year cycle of the ancient Greek Olympics.

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  3. Archaeology

    From Science News Letter, August 2, 1958

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  4. Archaeology

    BOOK LIST | The Tomb in Ancient Egypt

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  5. Archaeology

    Green reapers

    Agriculture's rise sparked widespread use of green stone beads as fertility charms and as protection against supernatural forces, scientists propose.

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  6. Archaeology

    Resurrection of a biblical tree

    Date palm pit found at Masada sprouts at age 2,000, becoming the oldest known seed to germinate.

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  7. Archaeology

    Acrobat’s last tumble

    Sacrificial offerings in an ancient Mesopotamian building included a beheaded acrobat, a new skeletal analysis suggests.

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  8. Archaeology

    Domain of the dead

    Researchers say that Stonehenge functioned as the largest cemetery of its time.

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  9. Archaeology

    Footprints in the ash

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  10. Archaeology

    Peruvian site yields a golden discovery

    The discovery of a 4,000-year-old gold necklace in Peru suggests that social elites and economic growth appeared in a surprisingly simple society.

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  11. Archaeology

    Zeus’ altar drew early visitors

    Archaeologists have discovered evidence that people used a ceremonial altar to the ancient Greek god Zeus around 5,000 years ago, a millennium before Zeus worship originated.

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  12. Archaeology

    The Black Death chose its victims selectively

    An analysis of medieval skeletons in England and Denmark finds that the devastating epidemic known as the Black Death killed excess numbers of people who were physically frail to begin with.

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