Life

  1. Animals

    Wild gerbils pollinate African desert lily

    Scientists in South Africa have found the first known examples of gerbils pollinating a flower.

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  2. Animals

    Poison birds copy ‘don’t touch’ feathers

    A subspecies of one of New Guinea's poisonous pitohui birds may be mimicking a toxic neighbor, according to a new genetic analysis.

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  3. Animals

    Shrimps spew bubbles as hot as the sun

    With the snap of a claw, a pinkie-size ocean shrimp generates a collapsing air bubble that's hot enough to emit faint light.

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  4. Animals

    Meerkat pups grow fatter with extra adults

    Meerkat pups growing up in large, cooperative groups are heftier because there are more adults to entreat for food.

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  5. Animals

    Shhh! Is that scrape a caterpillar scrap?

    A series of staged conflicts reveals the first known acoustic duels in caterpillars.

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  6. Paleontology

    New Fossils Resolve Whale’s Origin

    The first discovery of early whale fossils with key ankle bones intact provides compelling paleontological evidence that whales are closely related to many living ungulates, a relationship already supported by molecular data.

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  7. Animals

    Gimme, Gimme, Gimme!

    Hungry chicks cheeping in their nest have inspired a whole branch of scientific inquiry.

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  8. Ecosystems

    Fierce invader steals nests from a native fish

    The round goby, a Eurasian fish that has invaded the Great Lakes, is causing the decline of the mottled sculpin by displacing the native from its spawning sites.

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  9. Animals

    Social Cats

    Who says cats aren't social? And other musings from scientists who study cats in groups.

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  10. Animals

    Even deep down, the right whales don’t sink

    A right whale may weigh some 70 tons, but unlike other marine mammals studied so far, it tends to float rather than sink at great depths.

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  11. Animals

    It’s a snake! No, a fish. An octopus?

    An as-yet-unnamed species of octopus seems to be protecting itself by impersonating venomous animals from sea snakes to flatfish.

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  12. Paleontology

    New fossil sheds light on dinosaurs’ diet

    Vestiges of soft tissue preserved in a 70-million-year-old Mongolian fossil suggest that some dinosaurs could have strained small bits of food from the water and mud of streams and ponds, just like some modern aquatic birds do.

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