Search Results for: Insects

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6,601 results
  1. A black and white image of a fruit surrounded by white lines that show the leaps of roundworms.
    Physics

    Static electricity helps parasitic nematodes glom onto victims

    The small electric charge generated by a moving insect is enough to affect the trajectory of a parasitic nematode’s leap so it lands right on its host.

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  2. A diagram showing every nerve cell in a larval fruit fly brain, in all the colors of the rainbow, on a white backdrop
    Neuroscience

    Scientists have mapped an insect brain in greater detail than ever before

    Researchers have built a nerve cell “connectivity map” of a larval fruit fly brain. It’s the most complex whole brain wiring diagram yet made.

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  3. An orange and gray Australian painted lady sitting atop a bright magenta flower.
    Life

    76 percent of well-known insects fall outside protected areas

    Protected areas can provide safe havens for insects, but many existing ones fall short, a new study finds.

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  4. An illustration of a Tillyardembia sitting on a plant.
    Paleontology

    The oldest known pollen-carrying insects lived about 280 million years ago

    Pollen stuck to fossils of earwig-like Tillyardembia pushes back the earliest record of potential insect pollinators by about 120 million years.

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  5. A fossilized leaf of the extinct plant Gigantonoclea guizhouensis, with holes in pairs along the center
    Paleontology

    Insect bites in plant fossils reveal leaves could fold shut millions of years ago

    The 252-million-year-old fossil leaves have symmetrical holes, which suggest an insect bit through the leaves when they were folded.

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  6. A close up photo of a fossilized male katydid
    Paleontology

    Katydids had the earliest known insect ears 160 million years ago

    Fossils from the Jurassic Period show katydid ears looked identical to those of modern katydids and could pick up short-range calls.

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  7. A swarm of locusts flies over a field.
    Animals

    Insect swarms might generate as much electric charge as storm clouds

    Honeybees flying over a sensor measuring atmospheric voltage sparked a look into how insect-induced static electricity might affect the atmosphere.

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  8. fungi growing on wood
    Life

    Chemical signals from fungi tell bark beetles which trees to infest

    As fungi break down defensive chemicals in trees, some byproducts act as signals to bark beetle pests, telling them which trees are most vulnerable.

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  9. mealworms on a table, in a wooden spoon, and in a wooden bowl, surrounded by green leaves
    Science & Society

    A new seasoning smells like meat thanks to sugar — and mealworms

    A spoonful of sugars could help cooked mealworms go down more easily, a potential boon for the planet.

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  10. A still image from the television show The Last of Us showing a human body that has been completely covered by an orange fungus attached to a gray wall.
    Life

    Fungi don’t turn humans into zombies. But The Last of Us gets some science right

    Fungi like those in the post-apocalyptic TV show are real. But humans’ body temperature and brain chemistry may protect us from zombifying fungi.

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  11. a cat chewing a catnip plant
    Chemistry

    Cats chewing on catnip boosts the plant’s insect-repelling powers

    When cats tear up catnip, it increases the amount of insect-repelling chemicals released by the plants.

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  12. Fireflies near a paved path
    Animals

    Why you should care about ‘The Insect Crisis’

    A new book explains why insect populations are dwindling and why that’s a problem.

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