Search Results for: Monkeys

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2,656 results
  1. Genetics

    A genetic parasite may explain why humans and other apes lack tails

    Around 25 million years ago, a stretch of DNA inserted itself into an ancestral ape’s genome, an event that might have taken our tails away.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    A monkey survived two years with a miniature pig’s kidney

    A new study is the latest in a string of efforts seeking to use other animal species to solve the global organ shortage in people.

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  3. Anthropology

    Ancient primates’ unchipped teeth hint that they ate mostly fruit

    Of more than 400 teeth collected, just 21 were chipped, suggesting that early primate diets were soft on their choppers.

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  4. Animals

    Macaques in Puerto Rico learned to share shade after Hurricane Maria

    Animals that spent more time together on hot afternoons were less likely to die during the years following the storm, a new study finds.

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  5. Readers ask about AI ethics, monkey tool use and more

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  6. Archaeology

    A spider monkey’s remains tell a story of ancient diplomacy in the Americas

    A 1,700-year-old spider monkey skeleton unearthed at Teotihuacan in Mexico was likely a diplomatic gift from the Maya.

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  7. Anthropology

    Child sacrifices at famed Maya site were all boys, many closely related

    DNA analysis shows victims in one underground chamber at Chichén Itzá included twins, perhaps representing mythological figures.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Taurine slows aging in mice. Will it ever work for people?

    The amino acid taurine — found in meats, produced by the body and common in energy drinks — may have a role in health and aging, a new study suggests.

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  9. Archaeology

    Some monkeys accidentally make stone flakes that resemble ancient hominid tools

    A study of Thailand macaques raises questions about whether some Stone Age cutting tools were products of planning or chance.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    A brain-monitoring device may one day take the guesswork out of anesthesia

    The automated device pairing brain activity and dosing kept two macaques sedated for 125 minutes, raising hopes of precision anesthesia for people.

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  11. Animals

    In noisy environs, pied tamarins are using smell more often to communicate

    Groups of the primate, native to Brazil, complement vocalizations with scent-marking behavior to alert other tamarins to dangers in their urban home.

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  12. Animals

    When and why did masturbation evolve in primates? A new study provides clues

    In a first-of-its-kind comparative study, researchers show that primates were masturbating 40 million years ago and that the behavior may help males keep their sperm fresh.

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