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Katrina’s legacy: Refining hurricane forecasting

10 years later, lessons learned could save lives in next killer storm

By
5:30am, August 23, 2015
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HOPEFUL FORECAST  A decade after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, the storm’s legacy of destruction continues to spur life-saving storm forecasting improvements. Katrina killed nearly 2,000 people and flooded huge swaths of New Orleans (shown).

Ten years ago, the sea and sky rallied to unleash one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history. During the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, the most active season on record, 27 named storms —from Arlene to Zeta — swirled into existence. By far the most destructive was Hurricane Katrina.

Katrina killed nearly 2,000 people and caused an unprecedented $108 billion in damage from the time of its formation over the Atlantic Ocean on August 23, 2005, to its final demise eight days later near the Great Lakes.

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