Earth

  1. Earth

    They’re not briquettes, but they’ll do

    Chunks of fossil charcoal found in ancient sediments in north central Pennsylvania suggest that cycles of wildfire plagued Earth more than 360 million years ago.

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  2. Earth

    Lead Therapy Won’t Help Most Kids

    Removing lead from the blood fails to spare even moderately exposed children from cognitive impairments.

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  3. Earth

    Pump up a plateau to make a monsoon

    Computer models show that the onset and strengthening of Asian monsoons over the past 8 million to 9 million years are strongly linked to various stages in the uplift of the Tibetan plateau.

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  4. Earth

    Pacific Northwest stirred, not shaken

    Residents of the Pacific Northwest escaped the wrath of a magnitude 6.7 earthquake in the summer of 1999 because the ground movement of 20 centimeters along a deep fault occurred over a period of 6 to 15 days, not all at once.

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  5. Earth

    Big Bergs Ahoy!

    Although the break-up of Antarctica's northernmost ice shelves has been linked to warmer temperatures in the area, the cause of the unusual number of large icebergs calving from the continent's southern ice shelves last year was likely not global warming.

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  6. Earth

    A dietary cost of our appetite for gold

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  7. Earth

    Even low lead in kids has a high IQ cost

    Lead can damage a young child's ability to learn and reason at exposures far lower than the limit deemed acceptable by the U.S. government.

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  8. Earth

    Beware bathtub wines

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  9. Earth

    Sky Cycles

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  10. Earth

    Big dam in China may warm Japan

    Construction of the Three Gorges Dam across the Yangtze River in China may lead to warmer temperatures in Japan, because any diversion of water for Chinese agriculture could initiate convection in the Japan Sea that brings warmer water to the surface.

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  11. Earth

    Toxic runoff from plastic mulch

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  12. Earth

    Lasers show atmosphere differs from models

    New observations of the middle and upper atmosphere over Earth's polar regions may require scientists to revamp their mathematical models of temperature and other environmental conditions at high altitudes.

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