Cracking the body clock code wins trio a Nobel Prize | Science News

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Cracking the body clock code wins trio a Nobel Prize

Three Americans recognized for discovering the cellular gears that drive circadian rhythms

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5:22pm, October 2, 2017
Hall, Rosbash and Young

TICK TOCK  For their research identifying the molecular workings of the biological clock, Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young (from left to right) share the 2017 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

Discoveries about the molecular ups and downs of fruit flies’ daily lives have won Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

These three Americans were honored October 2 by the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm for their work in discovering important gears in the circadian clocks of animals. The trio will equally split the 9 million Swedish kronor prize — each taking home the equivalent of $367,000.

The researchers did their work in fruit flies. But “an awful lot of what was subsequently found out in the fruit flies turns out also to be true and of huge relevance to humans,” says John O’Neill, a circadian cell biologist at the MRC Laboratory of

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