How the brain perceives time | Science News

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How the brain perceives time

New experiments explore how the timekeepers in our heads help us make sense of the world

By
9:10am, July 15, 2015
illustration of clocks and the brain

CLOCKING IN  To perceive time, the brain relies on internal clocks that precisely orchestrate movement, sensing, memories and learning.

Everybody knows people who seem to bumble through life with no sense of time — they dither for hours on a “quick” e-mail or expect an hour’s drive to take 20 minutes. These people are always late. But even for them, such minor lapses in timing are actually exceptions. We notice these flaws precisely because they’re out of the ordinary.

Humans, like other animals, are quite good at keeping track of passing time. This talent does more than keep office meetings running smoothly. Almost everything our bodies and brains do requires precision clockwork — down to milliseconds. Without a sharp sense of time, people would be reduced to insensate messes, unable to move, talk, remember or learn.

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