Vol. 161 No. #14

More Stories from the April 6, 2002 issue

  1. Health & Medicine

    Clotting protein hinders nerve repair

    A blood-clotting protein called fibrin seems to exacerbate the regrowth problems that plague severed nerves.

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  2. Chemistry

    Noble gases and uranium get cozy

    Chemists have created the first compounds containing both uranium and noble gases.

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  3. Animals

    Real pandas do handstands

    A giant panda that upends itself into a handstand may be sending a message that it's one big bamboo-thrasher and not to be messed with.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    A tasty discovery about the tongue

    Scientists can now explain how the tongue tastes the amino acids in proteins.

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  5. Earth

    Satellites discover new Arctic islands

    Danish researchers analyzing satellite observations of remote Tobias Island, discovered in 1993 off the northeastern coast of Greenland, have stumbled upon a new group of small islands nearby.

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  6. Archaeology

    Stone Age Siberians move up in time

    Siberian sites previously thought to have been bases for early human excursions into North America may only date to about 11,300 years ago, when people have traditionally been assumed to have first reached Alaska.

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  7. Archaeology

    New World hunters get a reprieve

    New radiocarbon evidence indicates that, beginning around 11,000 years ago, human hunters contributed to North American mammal extinctions that had already been triggered by pronounced climate shifts.

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  8. Hot Cereal: Rice reveals bumper crop of genes

    Two research groups have identified all the genes in rice, the world's most important crop.

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  9. Materials Science

    Osmium is Forever: Rare metal’s strength humbles mighty diamond’s

    A new route to materials harder than diamond may have opened with the surprising finding that the rare metal osmium resists compression better than diamond does.

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  10. Night Patrol for Tired Cops: Police lose sleep over workday hassles

    A large proportion of big-city police officers suffers from insomnia and other serious sleep problems that stem from chronic work stress.

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  11. Animals

    Lamprey Allure: Females rush to males’ bile acid

    An unusual sex attractant has turned up in an analysis of sea lampreys, and it may inspire new ways to defend the Great Lakes against invasive species.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Scrambled Drugs: Transgenic chickens could lay golden eggs

    Scientists have created transgenic chickens able to produce foreign proteins—and, potentially, pharmaceuticals—in their eggs.

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  13. Health & Medicine

    Blood Vessel Poisoning: Arsenic narrows artery that feeds brain

    New research suggests that drinking arsenic-laden water can produce dangerous narrowing in the carotid artery, which channels blood through the neck to the brain.

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  14. Materials Science

    A Field of Diminutive Daisies

    Researchers have created tiny daisies as a demonstration of a new technique that creates three-dimensional structures from carbon nanotubes.

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  15. Math

    Guessing Secrets

    Analyzing an intriguing variant of the familiar game of 20 questions provides insights into Internet communication.

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  16. Health & Medicine

    Aerial War against Disease

    Researchers around the world are catching on to the idea of using satellites to predict where diseases may strike.

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