November 25, 2017 | Science News

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November 25, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill says scientists sometimes take risks that can lead to significant rewards and important discoveries.
By Elizabeth Quill | November 11, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 192 No. 9 , November 25, 2017 , p. 2

Features

map of Yamnaya migrations

Feature

Ancient steppe herders traveled into Europe and Asia, leaving their molecular mark and building Bronze Age cultures.
simulation of lumpy universe

Feature

Better simulating the dense parts of the universe could improve scientists’ view of how the universe evolves.

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Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill says scientists sometimes take risks that can lead to significant rewards and important discoveries.

Features

simulation of lumpy universe
Better simulating the dense parts of the universe could improve scientists’ view of how the universe evolves.
map of Yamnaya migrations
Ancient steppe herders traveled into Europe and Asia, leaving their molecular mark and building Bronze Age cultures.

News

A/2017 U1's trajectory
A newly spotted asteroid might be the first known to come from outside the solar system, and it could carry information about the makeup of alien planet systems.
New Delhi
First global look estimates the massive human and financial toll caused by pollution-related health problems.
experimental setup
“Delayed-choice” experiment performed in space reaffirms the idea that light can behave like a wave or a particle.
insect-inspired robot
Lightweight, insect-inspired robot can swim, fly and leap from the surface of water.
Artificial insulin-secreting cells
Synthetic cells crafted in the lab could provide a more precise, longer-lasting diabetes treatment.
Endangered population of orangutans is the oldest surviving red ape lineage, a new study finds.
lemurs
Longer dry spells and more nutrient-poor bamboo might eventually doom the greater bamboo lemur, a critically endangered species.
the Totten ice shelf
Winds may be helping warm ocean waters speed up the melting of East Antarctica’s largest glacier.
laser light in water
Light particles, or photons, swap energy like electrons in a superconductor.
Great Pyramid of Giza
High-energy particle imaging helps scientists peek inside one of the world’s oldest, largest monuments.
Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus rex may have used its small arms for slashing prey.
pencil erasing blood cells
New gene editors can correct common typos that lead to disease.
halo flower
Bees learn about colorful floral rings faster when nanoscale arrays aren’t quite perfect.
colliding neutron stars
The latest LIGO signal proves that gravitational waves travel at the speed of light, ruling out a swath of cosmological theories in the process.
Candida tropicalis
Fungi are overlooked contributors to health and disease.
meteorite impact
The Chicxulub impact spewed more sulfur than previously believed.
Refsnider on Baffin Island
Plants long entombed beneath Canadian ice are now emerging, telling a story of warming unprecedented in the history of human civilization.

Notebook

Enceladus
Lessons learned from flushing space toilets can help researchers plan life-hunting missions to icy moons.
Lord Howe stick insects
New genomic sequencing confirms that stick insects discovered near Lord Howe Island are the assumed-extinct Lord Howe stick insect.
prosthetic hand
Artificial limbs have come a long way since 1967.

Reviews & Previews

Kircher's map of Earth's core
"Beneath Our Feet" puts maps on display to show how people have envisioned and explored Earth’s subsurface.

Letters to the Editor

Readers wanted to know more about the scientists' research who were profiled in "The SN 10: Scientists to watch."

Science Visualized

pyramidal nerve cell
A catalog of live brain cells reveals stunning diversity and intricate shapes, and may help scientists understand the abilities of the human brain.