Humans

  1. Health & Medicine

    Vaccine may prevent some cervical cancers

    A new vaccine spurs people to produce a strong immune response against human papillomavirus, a virus that can infect both men and women and causes cervical cancer in women.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    Fighting cancer from the cabbage patch

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  3. Health & Medicine

    AIDS-treatment guidelines revised

    A panel of scientists has changed the guidelines for prescribing medication for HIV-infected patients, considerably lowering the suggested T-cell-count and HIV-copy thresholds.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    AIDS drug performs well in early test

    A new drug called T-1249, which keeps the AIDS virus from fusing with immune cells, proves largely safe in people.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Some HIV patients getting transplants

    Organ transplants succeed in some HIV-infected people, spurring further research into this practice.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Anti-HIV mutation poses hepatitis risk

    A genetic mutation that protects people from AIDS may also make them susceptible to hepatitis C.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    Active lung gene signals cancer spread

    The newly discovered LUNX gene, active only in lungs and in lung tumors that have spread outside that organ, may help in determining which lung cancer patients are likely to suffer a recurrence.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Color array reveals breast cancer types

    A suite of genes lights up when researchers probe for cancer.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    Sometimes an antibiotic is much more

    By reining in destructive enzymes in the body, tetracyclines can thwart various diseases, including periodontal bone loss and cancer.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Calcium supplements for chocolate

    Using soap chemistry, scientists prevented some of chocolate's saturated fat--and calories--from being absorbed.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Can childhood diets lead to diabetes?

    Prolonged consumption of foods that break down quickly into simple sugars appears to foster obesity and vulnerability to diabetes, an animal study shows.

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  12. Archaeology

    Maize domestication grows older in Mexico

    Maize cultivation existed in southern Mexico at least 6,300 years ago, according to a recent radiocarbon analysis of two maize cobs unearthed in a cave nearly 40 years ago.

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