The Science Life

  1. Chemist Michel Nieuwoudt and art historian Erin Griffey, both blond women wearing goggles, masks and lab coats, holding vials and standing in front of Renaissance-era art and a sign that reads Beautiful Chemistry
    Chemistry

    These researchers are unlocking Renaissance beauty secrets

    An art historian has teamed up with chemists to uncover the science behind cosmetics used around 500 years ago.

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  2. photo of a brown leech on a leaf
    Animals

    Leeches expose wildlife’s whereabouts and may aid conservation efforts

    DNA from the blood meals of more than 30,000 leeches shows how animals use the protected Ailaoshan Nature Reserve in China.

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  3. a Hill’s horseshoe bat in a green gloved hand
    Animals

    How scientists found an African bat lost to science for 40 years

    African researchers had been searching for the Hill’s horseshoe bat since 2013. Now, the first recording of its echolocation call may help find more.

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  4. Castleton Tower, a sandstone formation near Moab, Utah
    Earth

    How climbers help scientists vibe with Utah’s famous red rock formations

    Researchers teamed up with rock climbers to collect rare data that help them assess the seismic stability of red rock formations in Utah.

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  5. golden tortoise beetle on a leaf
    Animals

    Mirror beetles’ shiny bodies may not act as camouflage after all

    Hundreds of handmade clay nubbins test the notion that a beetle’s metallic high gloss could confound predators. Birds pecked the lovely idea to death.

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  6. scientist facing a rack of boxes of skeletal remains
    Chemistry

    One forensic scientist is scraping bones for clues to time of death

    The bones of more than 100 cadavers are shedding light on a more precise and reliable way to determine when someone died.

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  7. camera trap image of a fishing cat with a fish in its mouth
    Animals

    Scientists uncover the secret to fishing cats’ hunting success

    Volunteers in India have helped to explain how one of the world’s semiaquatic wild cat species hunts.

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  8. photo of Kristine Bohmann using a vacuum to collect air samples near a sloth hanging from a tree
    Animals

    Scientists vacuumed animal DNA out of thin air for the first time

    The ability to sniff out animals’ airborne genetic material has been on researchers’ wish list for over a decade.

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  9. image of vulture bees on a piece of chicken
    Animals

    Gut bacteria let vulture bees eat rotting flesh without getting sick

    Acid-producing bacteria in the gut of vulture bees let these “weirdos of the bee world” safely snack on animal carcasses.

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  10. close-up of the head of a black bird with a red beak
    Anthropology

    How catching birds bare-handed may hint at Neandertals’ hunting tactics

    By pretending to be Neandertals, researchers show that the ancient hominids likely had the skills to easily hunt crowlike birds called choughs.

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  11. a brown bird perches on a branch and sings
    Animals

    Some birds learn to recognize calls while still in their eggs

    For over a decade, behavioral ecologist Diane Colombelli-Négrel and colleagues have been studying how birds perceive sounds before hatching.

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  12. researcher releasing a great hammerhead shark into the ocean
    Animals

    A hammerhead shark baby boom near Florida hints at a historic nursery

    Finding an endangered shark nursery in a vast ocean is like finding a needle in a haystack. But that’s just what scientists did near Miami.

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