Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.


News in Brief

Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons

Brits appear to be more closely related to the island’s indigenous people

By
2:44pm, October 21, 2014

SAN DIEGO — Britons might not be Anglo-Saxons, a genetic analysis of five ancient skeletons hints.

When archaeological digs revealed ancient graves on the grounds of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, England, researchers there took it as a sign that they should analyze the ancient people’s DNA. Two skeletons were from men who were buried about 2,000 years ago. The other three skeletons were from women who died about 1,300 years ago, not long after the Anglo-Saxons invaded Britain.

The researchers were surprised to find that the older Iron Age men were genetically more similar to people living in Britain today than the Anglo-Saxon women were. Stephan Schiffels of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute reported the results October 20 at the

This article is only available to Science News subscribers. Already a subscriber? Log in now. Or subscribe today for full access.

Get Science News headlines by e-mail.

More from Science News

From the Nature Index Paid Content