Magnetism helps black holes blow off gas | Science News

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Magnetism helps black holes blow off gas

Winds rushing away from accretion disk are driven by magnetic fields

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11:00am, March 6, 2017
GRO J1655-40

WIND POWER  A black hole steals gas from a normal star in this artist’s illustration of the binary star system GRO J1655-40. Most of the gas is pulled into an inward-spiraling disk (red) around the black hole, but winds driven by magnetic fields blow some gas away.

Black holes are a bit like babies when they eat: Some food goes in, and some gets flung back out into space. Astronomers now say they understand how these meals become so messy — and it’s a trait all black holes share, no matter their size.

Magnetic fields drive the turbulent winds that blow gas away from black holes, says Keigo Fukumura, an astrophysicist at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va. Using X-rays emitted from a relatively small black hole siphoning gas from a nearby star, Fukumura and colleagues traced the winds flowing from the disk of stellar debris swirling around the black hole. Modeling these winds showed that magnetism, not other means, got the gas moving in just the right way.

The model was previously used to explain the way winds flow around black holes millions of times the mass of the sun. Showing that the model now also works for a smaller stellar-mass black hole

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