Getting NASA’s Pluto mission off the ground took blood, sweat and years | Science News

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Getting NASA’s Pluto mission off the ground took blood, sweat and years

Alan Stern dishes about the new book ‘Chasing New Horizons’

By
6:00am, May 6, 2018
Pluto

LOVE ALWAYS, PLUTO  New Horizons took this image of Pluto on July 14, 2015, when the spacecraft was 768,000 kilometers away from the dwarf planet’s surface — and 7.5 billion kilometers away from Earth. The journey to get the mission off the ground was a labor of love. 

Chasing New Horizons
Alan Stern and David Grinspoon
Picador, $28

The world tracked the New Horizons’ spacecraft with childlike glee as it flew by Pluto in 2015. The probe provided the first ever close-up of the place that many of us grew up considering the ninth planet. Pluto revealed itself as a fascinating world, with a shifting surface (SN: 12/26/15, p. 16), a hazy atmosphere (SN Online: 10/15/15) and a heart of nitrogen ice

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