Vol. 192 No. 3 Read Digital Issue Archives

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More Stories from the September 2, 2017 issue

  1. Canaanite skeleton
    Anthropology

    Ancient DNA offers clues to the Canaanites’ fate

    DNA is painting a more detailed portrait of the ancient Canaanites, who have largely been studied through the secondhand accounts of their contemporaries.

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  2. Titan
    Space

    Potential ingredient for alien life found on Titan

    The atmosphere and oceans of Saturn’s moon Titan contain vinyl cyanide, a compound predicted to form cell-like bubbles.

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  3. diamonds are forever
    Materials Science

    Diamond joins the realm of 2-D thin films, study suggests

    Scientists squeezed graphene sheets into diamondene.

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  4. Rajasthan, India
    Climate

    South Asia could face deadly heat and humidity by the end of this century

    If climate change is left unchecked, simulations show extreme heat waves in densely populated agricultural regions of India and Pakistan. 

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  5. Artificial light
    Life

    Light pollution can foil plant-insect hookups, and not just at night

    Upsetting nocturnal pollinators has daylight after-effects for Swiss meadow flowers.

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  6. Juan Collar
    Particle Physics

    Neutrinos seen scattering off an atom’s nucleus for the first time

    New type of interaction confirms that neutrinos play by the rules.

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  7. asteroid wreckage illustration
    Astronomy

    The solar system’s earliest asteroids may have all been massive

    A team of astronomers says the original asteroids all came in one size: extra large.

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  8. deformed mouse pancreas proteins
    Health & Medicine

    Spread of misfolded proteins could trigger type 2 diabetes

    Experiments in mice raise the question of whether type 2 diabetes might be transmissible.

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  9. T2K experiment
    Particle Physics

    Neutrino experiment may hint at why matter rules the universe

    T2K experiment hints at an explanation for what happened to antimatter.

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  10. infant ape skull
    Anthropology

    Infant ape’s tiny skull could have a big impact on ape evolution

    Fossil comes from a lineage that had ties to the ancestor of modern apes and humans, researchers argue.

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  11. archaea microbe DNA
    Genetics

    The first look at how archaea package their DNA reveals they’re a lot like us

    Archaea microbes spool their DNA much like plants and animals do.

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  12. piglets lacking PERVs
    Genetics

    Gene editing creates virus-free piglets

    Pigs engineered to lack infectious viruses may one day produce transplant organs.

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  13. Tirol, Austria
    Climate

    Climate change is shifting when Europe’s rivers flood

    Data spanning 50 years shows that today, floods come days, weeks, even months earlier in some areas and later in others.

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  14. illustration of an ancient arrow worm
    Paleontology

    This ancient sea worm sported a crowd of ‘claws’ around its mouth

    A newly discovered species of arrow worm that lived over half a billion years ago had about twice as many head spines as its modern kin.

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  15. diagram of Sprite
    Astronomy

    These chip-sized spacecraft are the smallest space probes yet

    Space initiative dubbed Breakthrough Starshot sent the smallest spacecraft yet into orbit around Earth.

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  16. opioids
    Health & Medicine

    One in three U.S. adults takes opioids, and many misuse them

    More than a third of U.S. adults used prescription opioids in 2015, and nearly 13 percent of that group misused the painkillers in some way.

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  17. Cassini spacecraft
    Planetary Science

    ‘Death Dive to Saturn’ celebrates the Cassini probe’s accomplishments

    A new documentary, “Death Dive to Saturn,” takes a look back at the Cassini spacecraft’s 13 years at Saturn and what to expect from its final days.

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  18. old photo of woman at grocery store
    Science & Society

    How science has fed stereotypes about women

    A new book, Inferior, shows how biased research branded women as inferior and aims to set the record straight.

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