Planetary Science

  1. Ryugu asteroid
    Planetary Science

    Ryugu is probably a chip off one of these two other asteroids

    Japan’s Hayabusa2 team has narrowed down the asteroid Ryugu’s origins based on its color.

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  2. Bennu
    Planetary Science

    Surprising astronomers, Bennu spits plumes of dust into space

    Bennu spews dust from its rocky surface, which may be a new kind of asteroid activity.

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  3. Ultima Thule
    Planetary Science

    Ultima Thule may be a frankenworld

    The first geologic map of Ultima Thule shows it might be made of many smaller rocks that clumped together under the force of their own gravity.

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  4. ‘Oumuamua
    Astronomy

    3 explanations for ‘Oumuamua that aren’t alien spaceships

    Astronomers are coming up with some creative ideas to explain the weird behavior of the first known interstellar object.

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  5. Hayabusa2
    Planetary Science

    Hayabusa2 just tried to collect asteroid dust for the first time

    The Japanese Hayabusa2 spacecraft touched down on asteroid Ryugu and attempted to gather a sample of its rock to bring back to Earth.

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  6. Neptune, Proteus and Hippocamp
    Planetary Science

    Neptune’s smallest moon may be a chip off another moon

    Neptune’s tiniest moon probably formed when a comet hit a larger moon.

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  7. Mars ice caps
    Planetary Science

    Mars’ lake may need an underground volcano to exist

    If a lake under Martian ice is real, there must be a subsurface magma pool to keep conditions warm enough for water to remain liquid, scientists say.

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  8. shadow of Opportunity rover on Mars
    Planetary Science

    After 15 years on Mars, it’s the end of the road for Opportunity

    After 15 years of exploring Mars, a dust storm led to the demise of NASA’s longest-lived rover.

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  9. object striking moon during lunar eclipse
    Planetary Science

    A basketball-sized rock hit the moon during the last lunar eclipse

    Professional and amateur astronomers joined forces to analyze the impact.

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  10. Kepler exoplanet
    Astronomy

    A space rock collision may explain how this exoplanet was born

    Simulations suggest a planet roughly 2,000 light-years away formed when two space rocks collided, supporting the idea that such events are universal.

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  11. Titan
    Planetary Science

    Titan’s oddly thick atmosphere may come from cooked organic compounds

    Saturn’s moon Titan might get some of its hazy atmosphere by baking organic molecules in a warm core.

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  12. Curiosity rover
    Planetary Science

    NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover weighed the mountain it’s climbing

    Curiosity measures gravity as it drives, allowing scientists to weigh Mount Sharp and determine that the rock is less dense than expected.

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