Early work on human growth hormone paved way for synthetic versions | Science News

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50 Years Ago

Early work on human growth hormone paved way for synthetic versions

Excerpt from the May 21, 1966, issue of Science News

By
11:09am, May 12, 2016
Kryptoprin

GROW  Human growth hormone can be made in the laboratory by bacteria equipped with human hormone genes. The brand of hormone above, Kryptoprin, is prescribed for children with growth hormone deficiencies. 

Growth hormone mapped — Discovery of the complete chemical structure of the human growth hormone has been reported…. The discovery marks a major advance toward understanding how the powerful growth-promoting substance works and increases the chances for its eventual synthesis in the laboratory…. Some 5,000 fresh human pituitary glands were required to achieve the results.
— Science News, May 21, 1966

 

Update

In 1979, researchers produced a synthetic human growth hormone in the lab, using bacteria equipped with human hormone genes. Six years later, the synthetic growth hormone was approved for medical use; distribution of growth hormone collected from human pituitary

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