‘Monkeytalk’ invites readers into the complex social world of monkeys | Science News

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‘Monkeytalk’ invites readers into the complex social world of monkeys

Researcher shares stories of science and life in the field

By
8:00am, March 5, 2017
Barbary macaques

MONKEY-BACK RIDE  In a new book, a primatologist discusses what’s known about intelligence and social behavior in several monkey species, including Barbary macaques (shown).

Monkeytalk
Julia Fischer
Univ. of Chicago, $25

The social lives of macaques and baboons play out in what primatologist Julia Fischer calls “a magnificent opera.” When young Barbary macaques reach about 6 months, they fight nightly with their mothers. Young ones want the “maternal embrace” as they snooze; mothers want precious alone time. Getting pushed away and bitten by dear old mom doesn’t deter young macaques. But they’re on their own when a new brother or sister comes along.

In Monkeytalk, Fischer describes how the monkey species she studies have evolved their own forms of intelligence and communication. Connections exist between monkey and human minds, but Fischer regards differences

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