What the Perseverance rover’s quiet landing reveals about meteor strikes on Mars

The rover’s arrival was a rare chance to see how the Red Planet absorbs energy from impacts

image of Perseverance rover from above, landing on Mars

Caption: NASA’s Perseverance rover (shown touching down on Mars in February) landed a few thousand kilometers away from the lander InSight, which attempted to use seismic waves to detect Perseverance’s arrival.

JPL-Caltech/NASA

The lander was listening. On February 18, NASA’s InSight lander on Mars turned its attention to the landing site for another mission, Perseverance, hoping to detect its arrival on the planet.

But InSight heard nothing.

Tungsten blocks ejected by Perseverance during entry landed hard enough to create craters on the Martian surface. Collisions like these — whether from space missions or meteor strikes — send shock waves through the ground. Yet in the first experiment of its kind on another world, InSight failed to pick up any seismic waves from the blocks’ impacts, researchers report October 28 in Nature Communications.

As a result, researchers think that less than 3 percent of the energy from the impacts made its way into the Martian surface. The intensity of impact-generated rumblings varies from planet to planet and is “really important for understanding how the ground will change from a big impact event,” says Ben Fernando, a geophysicist at the University of Oxford.

photos of crater on Mars
Perseverance left behind several craters (one indicated with the arrow) after pieces of the mission disengaged as planned during entry, creating a rare opportunity to see how Mars absorbs energy from impacts. Univ. of Arizona, JPL-Caltech/NASA

But getting these measurements is tricky. Scientists need sensitive instruments placed relatively near an impact site. Knowing when and where a meteor will strike is nearly impossible, especially on another world.

Enter Perseverance: a hurtling space object set to hit Mars at an exact time and place (SN: 2/17/21). To help with its entry, Perseverance dropped about 78 kilograms of tungsten as the rover landed about 3,450 kilometers from InSight. The timing and weight of the drop provided a “once-in-a-mission opportunity” to study the immediate seismic effects of an impact from space, Fernando says.

The team had no idea whether InSight would be able to detect the blocks’ impacts or not, but the quiet arrival speaks volumes. “It lets us put an upper limit on how much energy from the tungsten blocks turned into seismic energy,” Fernando says. “We’ve never been able to get that number for Mars before.”

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