Vol. 180 No. #14 Archives

More Stories from the December 31, 2011 issue

  1. Life

    A gland grows itself

    Japanese researchers coax a pituitary to develop from stem cells in a lab dish.

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  2. Physics

    Superconductor may hide long-sought secret

    It conducts electricity without resistance, sure; but a new material could also demonstrate the existence of a particle proposed 70 years ago.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Coffee delivers jolt deep in the brain

    Caffeine strengthens electrical signals in a portion of the hippocampus, a study in rats finds.

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  4. Life

    Biology’s big bang had a long fuse

    The fossil record’s earliest troves of animal life are the result of more than 200 million years of evolution.

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  5. Space

    Distant world looks ripe for life

    Extrasolar planet hunt spots its most Earthlike orb yet.

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  6. Life

    Bacteria in bondage

    Cells unleash proteins to cage unwanted invaders.

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  7. Life

    Eggs have own biological clock

    Reproductive cells age independently from the rest of the body, research in worms reveals.

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  8. Earth

    Dead Sea once went dry

    The Holy Land’s salt lake ran out of water during a warm spell about 120,000 years ago, which suggests it could disappear again.

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  9. Life

    Building the body electric

    Eyes can be grown in a frog’s gut by changing cells’ electrical properties, scientists find, opening up new possibilities for generating and regenerating complex organs.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Bedbugs not averse to inbreeding

    The pests have also developed ways to resist common insecticides, research shows.

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  11. Life

    He’s no rat, he’s my brother

    Rodents exhibit empathy by setting trapped friends free.

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  12. Chemistry

    Deep-sea battery comes to light

    Microbes fuel a weak electrical current at hydrothermal vents.

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  13. Earth

    Weather affects timing of some natural hazards

    Seasonal patterns in earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be linked to rain and snow in certain locations.

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  14. Physics

    Tantalizing hints of long-sought particle

    Europe’s LHC collider finds traces of what could be the Higgs boson, a theoretical entity that explains why matter has mass.

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  15. SN Online

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  16. Science Future for December 31, 2011

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  17. Science Past from the issue of December 30, 1961

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  18. Galileo’s Muse by Mark A. Peterson

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  19. Frozen Planet: A World Beyond Imagination by Alastair Fothergill and Vanessa Berlowitz

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  20. The Fossil Chronicles: How Two Controversial Discoveries Changed Our View of Human Evolution by Dean Falk

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  21. Super Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things: Power Devices with Your Plants, Modify High-Tech Toys, Turn a Penny into a Battery, Make Sneaky Light-up Nails … Sneaky Levitation with Everyday Things by Cy Tymony

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  22. Book Review: Relics: Travels in Nature’s Time Machine by Piotr Naskrecki

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  23. Book Review: Time Travel and Warp Drives by Allen Everett and Thomas Roman and How to Build a Time Machine by Brian Clegg

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  24. 2011 Science News of the Year: Nutrition

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  25. 2011 Science News of the Year: Molecules

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  26. 2011 Science News of the Year: Environment

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  27. 2011 Science News of the Year: Genes & Cells

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  28. 2011 Science News of the Year: Matter & Energy

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  29. 2011 Science News of the Year: Body & Brain

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  30. 2011 Science News of the Year: Life

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  31. 2011 Science News of the Year: Technology

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  32. 2011 Science News of the Year: Earth

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  33. 2011 Science News of the Year: Humans

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  34. 2011 Science News of the Year

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  35. Science & Society

    2011 Science News of the Year: Science & Society

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  36. 2011 Science News of the Year: Atom & Cosmos

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  37. Letters

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  38. American and Dutch physicists reach new low temperature

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  39. An Engineer’s Alphabet by Henry Petroski

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