Latest Issue of Science News

January 5, 2002

  • News

    Bolts from the blue can have long reach

    Current U.S. Air Force operating procedures recommend personnel stop working outdoors when lightning is spotted within 5 nautical miles, but a new analysis suggests that this distance may not be adequate to fully protect aircraft and ground crews.
  • News

    Southeastern Alaska is on the rebound

    Scientists using the Global Positioning System to track ground movement along faults in southeastern Alaska have measured something entirely different—the rapid rise of parts of the region due to the recent melting of glaciers.
  • News

    Toxic metals taint ancient dust

    A new study of dust lofted to Antarctica suggests that excess amounts of trace metals coated dust grains long before human industrial activity began loading the atmosphere with pollutants.
  • News

    Turbulence leads to early rain of ash

    A new aerodynamic analysis suggests that chaotic turbulence in a high-altitude cloud of volcanic ash can cause small particles of the ash to clump together and fall to the ground much closer to the volcano than expected.
  • Feature

    Getting Out the Thorn

    Researchers are developing new ways to improve the compatibility of implantable biomaterials in the body.
  • News

    A glass of red may keep arteries loose

    A newly uncovered effect of a compound abundant in red wines may provide the mechanism needed to explain how reds could outperform whites and rosés in reducing heart disease.